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1985 Escaper full suspension and steering overhaul tips, tricks, and questions


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Only if your rig was made between 8/85 and 8/86 and has the original axle. If it is yes only the drivers side. If not all others are normal wheels

Linda S

Clue. Do the rear wheels have 6 hand holds? Those would be the left hand nut era

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FWIW, you have a broken stud that your going to have to replace. Prevent future problems replace all of them with right hand studs.

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I bought a 3 ton harbor freight floor jack today. Topped it off with oil and now it does not tighten. Is a 3 ton jack adequate? I’m going to return it and find a used one on Craig’s list.

F6ADF249-B3B2-4874-A8D1-C00C87BEFB46.jpeg

Edited by hamkid
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3 tons is plenty but why would you add oil. I didn't even know you could and I've had my Harbor Freight jack for years. Mine is a 2 ton by the way and it's been used lots. Absolutely change those studs. Not good to drive with a broken one and then you'd never have the let hand ones to worry about again. Someone turning it the wrong way is how it probably got broken Here are the right hand Toyota studs

https://www.toyotapartsdeal.com/oem/toyota~bolt~hub~for~rear~axle~90942-02056.html

Linda S

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Try bleeding it again. Remove the fill plug and turn the handle Turn handle counterclockwise, pump a couple of times, turn the handle clockwise and pump a few times. install the plug and try it again.

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You probably got a bum jack - my old man gave me one a few years ago, new from Harbor Freight, it goes up then loses pressure & descends - if I'm quick enough I can put it at max height then slam the jack stand in place before it's come down far enough.  ;  )    Yep find a used, or a better brand.

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Had it happen on several harbor freight jacks. Best solution I found was to jack it up to full height with no weight on it. Release the valve, then force the sleeve to retract (usually by standing on it). Try this a couple of times and it should hold. New jacks should not need any additional fluid.

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If the handle just spins, maybe the u joint is not tight. Remove the cover and see whats going on. If everything is turning then the jack has internal problem and needs to be replaced

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Put jackstands under the frame, NOT crossmembers, floor pans, or suspension. You will be OK

Edited by WME
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All 4 corners OK

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How big is your air compressor??

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What HP, pressure and how many CFM?

Most wrenches that size need 90 psi and 5-7 CFM.

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Hamkid, Please don't take offense, but I believe that at your stage of mechanical learning you might be better off without an impact wrench.  I have overhauled many engines and transmissions without one.  I do have air, and always have, but I have seen a lot of damage done with impact wrenches.  Admittedly, they make the job go faster, - that is not necessarily a good thing.  

We all like seeing someone get into fixing their own stuff, so keep at it.  

If you do end up buying an air compressor, I would recommend against the direct drive oil-less.  Buy one that is belt driven.  2 belts are better than one.  And if you find one that you think will do the job, buy the next size larger.  There are a few variables wrt cfm and pressure.  Shop carefully.  I was called to someones house not long ago because his impact wrench wouldn't loosen his wheel lugs.  His hose was only 1/4 inch and the air compressor was marginal to start with.  Loaned him my hose and it zipped them right off.  Not all impact wrenches are the same and it has been my experience that the inexpensive ones with unfamiliar brand names will not come close to the advertized torque.  

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I was afraid that you might respond as you did.  

Please do.  Start the project.  We all want to help.  

My sons would tell me to bow out that I'm 79 years old and I should be seen, not heard.  They are both excellent amateur mechanics.

(wrt rusty bolts, PB Blaster is pretty good stuff.  And a good 6 point socket wrench or box wrench will almost always do the job.)

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There will be lots of struggle ahead, unless your rig is pristine underneath. For those of us without a lift + many thousands in tools, suspension work on an old truck is not impossible... but a True Test.
 

Impact wrench may be helpful, but I’d lean more towards good ratchets/sockets, breaker bar, torch, grinder with cutting discs, BFH, and plenty of PB Blaster. 
 

It can be done, if you’ve got the energy and time to put into it! (If you or a buddy is built like a gorilla, that would help too. 😬 )
 

 

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Thanks for the inspiration. I welcome all input and opinions. Please do not hesitate to post what you think, it’s impossible to offend me, but will always cause me to over think. 
 

What size breaker bar should I purchase?

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After soaking my pumpkin bolt with PB Blaster for several days and breaking my knuckles with a breaking bar I gave up. I went with a 1/2" 250 LB electric impact wrench and impact sockets from Harbor Freight. The bolt came out in milliseconds to my surprise. Cheaper than an air compressor and wrench for sure.

 

Yes PB blaster and a give it a shot with the wrench but after that go with the impact wrench.

 

Save your knuckles!

Gary

Edited by Gary_M
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PB Blaster yes, yes. Lug nuts may be a bit stubborn, but they have been on and off a few times so a little PB and a low setting on the air wrench and they will come off (don't forget the left handed nuts). With a wrench that big ALWAYS start on the lowest setting and give it a little time, before adjusting it to stun and then to kill

The axle nuts are a different story lots of PB and a little torch heat over 3-4 days. They are small nuts and a big impact wrench can just twist the studs in half. Don't forget the cold chisel and BFH to get the lock cones out of the axle cap.

The leaf springs bushing bolts are bigger but will be just as rusted, again PB and time. Maybe a bit more omph on the air wrench.

Brake calipers are hand tools, so is everything under the hood.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Go team go:hyper:

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Decision time, new stuff or DIY rebuild.

1 set L&R new brake rotors and pads $180, new caliper $40 ea, also R&L, wheel bearings $7 per side (2bearings), hub seal $2 ea need L&R

 

DIY redo Caliper rebuild kit $4 ea, Brake pads $40, Turn rotors $25 ea, a bucket of brake cleaner, new seals $2 ea

 

Just a thought these are the brakes, do you trust your skill levels?

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