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1985 Escaper full suspension and steering overhaul tips, tricks, and questions


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2 hours ago, hamkid said:

Top notch mate! (Olde English accent)

Thats Aussie talk, Olde English would be Top Notch GuvūüėĀ

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Well a 20 ton press is usefulūüėĚ.

A few pieces of pipe, a stack of washers, some nuts and a foot of thread all.  One pipe needs to be big enough to 

for the bushing to fit through and the other needs to be sized to push against the sleeve or at the rubber edge.

Then there's the cave man approach get a torch and burn the bushing  out.

Check the rental places too. The correct tool set runs $400+

 

 

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You better read this link first

 

as far as I know no one has been able to get those things out by themselves. jjrbus had his local neighborhood workshop wrench guy get them out but I think it took him like two days.

I tried and failed but I didn't have a 20 ton press I think that would have worked. The rental tool for pressing out control arm bushings from AutoZone wouldn't work because the size and the design of those control arms made it not fit in there correctly even trying all the adapters. 

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Oh and if you do get them out yourself please take pictures and let us know step by step how you did it thanks

 

 

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I chose to skip this aggravation and just replace the whole upper CA, like many others have done; the aftermarket ones from Dorman (522-651) worked fine for me and didn’t break the bank.
 

The lower¬†arm¬†bushing in the crossmember (supposedly,¬†the ‚Äúeasier‚ÄĚ one) was more than enough trouble to replace; have to pick your battles sometimes...

Edited by Ctgriffi
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54 minutes ago, Ctgriffi said:

...the aftermarket ones from Dorman (522-651) worked fine for me...

 

However, doesn't look like those ^ fit your chassis and not sure what the aftermarket options are, if any, for your rig (is your chassis 84 or 85?). Maybe a bushing change is your best cost-effective route.

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Get a flapper sanding drum and clean up all the holes for the bushings,a smear of grease on the outer shell will make things much easier.

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  • 2 weeks later...

That part is different than what I’ve seen, different than the OEM style bushings that I used. Is that an Energy Suspension bushing? Interesting that the original metal sleeve stays in the CA and gets reused... removing the sleeve was probably the hardest part of the whole front end rebuild for me; mine felt like it was welded in there!

 

In terms of the orientation, yes, you typically install it from front to back, like your photo. 
 

(Yeah, wire wheels in a drill are excellent for rust/paint removal; they also come in lots of shapes and sizes too.)

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yup Energy suspension brand. Have to reuse the sleeves for both control arms. The style is different than the original. I just wanted to be sure before I install it.

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Thread all, nuts and fender washers, along with a larger socket will let you pull it up snug.

With to much sticking out you may not get the lower arm on.

This is one place that a BFH is the wrong tool.

Edited by WME
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Worst case scenario, if you run out of the special bushing grease. A suitable sub is outboard engine lower gearbox/boat trailer wheel bearing grease. The grease is tacky and water resistant.

P.S. its grease not lube 

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Looks like you used the right stuff, energy suspension formula 5.

I was just saying that if you run out of that stuff, then the outboard grease is a good sub, regular chassis grease is not a suitable sub.

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Yeah. Every time I've gotten new shocks, none of them have come with washers so I just use the old ones. I would take a wire brush to it and hit it with a little wd40. 

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I'm not 110% sure, but it looks like your original damper was installed wrong.

Trying to do words for proper install, instead of a pic will be fun.

SO Here goes... damper, silver cup washer, rubber isolator, truck frame, rubber isolator, silver cup washer, nut.

Hope this makes sense

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I did this job on mine a few years back, using the same Monore part, which has worked well for me. Anyway, I agree with WME about the order/installation: If you look at photo on the box your new stabilizer came in (posted, up above), do it like that, with the truck frame/bracket in between the two rubber isolators. 

 

Went and looked at that front end on mine just now, and that is ^ correct.

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That's it. :)

 

I don't know that there's a specific torque recommended for that nut, but I would tighten it down until the rubber isolators just start to squish out, to the sides (i.e. it's looking a bit loose in your photo).

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I used the new pin that was provided, with the offset and cotter pin, etc. No problems.

 

You're gonna love how much better that thing drives/handles, once it's all said and done, btw. Keep it up! 

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