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A43D Aisin-Warner ===Just a couple of bit's of info for anyone running this trans.. Remember that this unit was built for lesser loads than most of you are hauling...With your camper on this chassis, your trans is working at full load capacity at ALL times...

HEAT, is the largest cause of failure in all automatics...ADD the largest cooler that you can fit in the space provided.

Two failure spots are: the bellville spring breaking in the clutch drum..a design flaw, beyond your control..Your trans will last longer if you do not pull out into traffic & floor it...When it is time to shift, back out a bit & allow the next clutch set to apply under lite throttle..Under full throttle shifts there is high demand on all clutches.

The major cause of failure, other than heat, one that you can control is; the output shaft BUSHING.......

There is not a lot of fluid activity in this area, so you need to crawl under there & check for play in this bushing. From time to time.

If this bushing wears, it will not only leak, but will cause failure in the gov. rings........THEN it is trannytime :-(

SO KEEP YOUR EYE ON THIS BUSHING..........Donnie

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How much side-side play is acceptable on the tail shaft??

John Mc

88 Dolphin 4 Auto

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If you have play in the output shaft it is an easy fix and it should not be put off. If you feel it is excessive it probably is. They are a neat fit and should not wiggle much. The output shaft has no real support other then the tail stock bushing. The next thing forward is the governor bore when the tail stock bushing gets worn out the governor assemble starts to support the output shaft it was not meant to do this so the governor rings start to cut into the case (it has no bushing) soon the shifting will go crazy and the only fix is a trans overhaul because the only way you can get the governor out it to dismantle the entire trans it does not come out the back. I have not done any of the really later ones (they use a much refined one to this day in the pickup's) so I don't know if they changed the design or not but the old ones (read Toy homes) had kits and tools to repair the cases, the case was bored oversize and a bushing was installed thus saving the case. This really could have been fixed with a nice roller bearing in the back

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I read through this entire thread.

So even if the trans is working fine, the tail shaft bushing might be worn and be leaking?

What would be an approx. cost of bushing replacement at a large trans shop?

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Here's my small experience with 'large transmission shops'. They don't want to fix only what's broken. They want to sell and install a complete rebuilt transmission even if it's only a seal that has a small leak. :(

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I read through this entire thread.

So even if the trans is working fine, the tail shaft bushing might be worn and be leaking?

What would be an approx. cost of bushing replacement at a large trans shop?

Just about any trans with a slip-yoke in the back of the trans can have a small leak out the back where the driveshaft plugs in. From what I've seen, it is much less of an issue with these Toyotas then with many GM full size rigs. The new bushing for the A43D in the Toyota is only $4 (ATP # RB13). The new seal is $4 (ATP # RO85). If you had one that was very loose, or a chronic leaker - it would likely need a new driveshaft yoke also - the polished metal splined tube that rides inside that bushing. I think you're pretty much worried about nothing unless you've got a persistent leak.

The issue with many cars and trucks with "slip-yokes" and rear wheel drive is this. When ever you hit a bump, the rear axle moves a little fore and aft. So the yoke on the end of the driveshaft that plugs into the back of the transmission can get worn if there is a lot of movement in the rear suspension. With just about all the GM light duty trucks I've had, that rear bushing sees a lot of wear. Heavy duty trucks it's NOT much of an issue becaue they are set up differently. In many HD trucks, the driveshaft is not allowed to travel in and out of the rear of the trans. Instead, the driveshaft is two piece and splined in the middle. So in that setup, the fore and aft movement is taken up by a slip-joint in the middle of the driveshaft.

In the Toyota with the A43D, there IS a two piece driveshaft but NO slip joint in the shaft. I guess Toyota figured there is so little fore and aft movement with the rear axle, it is not an issue. Seems to be true. The center ball-bearing driveshaft hanger is rubber cushioned and seems to allow the small amount of for-aft movement when you hit a bump. It always struck me as an odd design. But with any Toyota RV I've had, it's pretty heavy in back, the leaf springs are pretty flat, and there's not much movement back there. Even less movement if you've got air-bags as supplemental suspension.

Anyway, I doubt you have anything to worry about if you don't have any leak big enough to drip oil on the ground. Putting a new bushing and seal in there when there is no leak is kind of a waste of time, money. Just a new seal, yes. I do it anytime the driveshaft has been out in any vehicle.

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The tail shaft bushing supports the end of the transmission output shaft it is a simple job and should be done if the seal is leaking because that's probably why it's leaking. I am not fond of franchised transmission shops for several reasons if it needs doing a local independent shop would be where I would take it, if you can, find one that is a member of ATRA..

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That rear bushing directly supports the drive-shaft yoke, not the transmission output shaft. When that yoke is in place, it also supports the output shaft of the transmission. It is not uncommon to need a new driveshaft yoke in a chronic leaker. That bronze bushing is only half of the wear-area. The driveshaft yoke is the other half. Granted that the driveshaft yoke is steel and more durable then bronze. My point is, when there area has a substantial leak, often both the bushing and the yoke needs replacement. Not always as easy as just a seal and a bushing.

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Some added comments. Last I checked, Toyota or Aisin doesn't even sell a replacement bushing for the tailshaft. I suspect because at the factory, an undersize bushing is pressed in and then finished honed in-place. The replacement bushings I'm aware of are aftermarket.

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It is the only support for the output shaft the splines fit inside of the yoke the bushing supports the yoke there is no bearing at the back. A trashed yoke bushing will soon cause the governor rings to dig into the case. By the way there is also a reamer and bushing available to repair a damaged case, If it's leaking most likely the bushing is bad but if you like to live on the wild side leave it alone. The bushings are available make sure the oil hole is lined up.

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OK, you guys are now talking my language, reamers :-) (I have a few reamers for my benchrest barrels).

Derek et Maineah, gotcha large shops are too rigid and not interested in small jobs, that is my experience also.

but to gauge $$$, I use large shops to get estimates for worst case.

I am asking cuz I might be buying another toyo to use while I fix my 90 winni. $$$ is pretty tight.

JDE et Maineah, thanks for the details. I can visualize the issue and the parts from reading the posts!

So as long as we keep the tranny topped off, a little leak on the rear (other than polluting) is not going to harm the tranny.

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So as long as we keep the tranny topped off, a little leak on the rear (other than polluting) is not going to harm the tranny.



NO !


Find an independent shop that can replace the bushing WITHOUT removing the extension housing.....There are bushing pullers that can reach in and grab the bushing (they have 4 expanding jaws that will fit over the output shaft & a bolt that contacts the end of the shaft to push on)....any good shop will be able to replace the bushing & seal in 10 minutes after removing the drive shaft out of the way...With the correct tools it is easy.


If you can feel any play when trying to move the yoke, Replace the bushing & seal...FM makes this bushing available in either brass clad or babbit / alloy.....either is fine...Brass will last longer.. When checking for movement, make sure that the trans is not loaded against the parking pawl


if the wheels are on the ground, block them so the truck can't roll & put the trans in neutral


If your shop insists that he has to remove the housing to replace the bushing & seal....Find another shop.......donnie

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It is the only support for the output shaft the splines fit inside of the yoke the bushing supports the yoke there is no bearing at the back. A trashed yoke bushing will soon cause the governor rings to dig into the case. By the way there is also a reamer and bushing available to repair a damaged case, If it's leaking most likely the bushing is bad but if you like to live on the wild side leave it alone. The bushings are available make sure the oil hole is lined up.

No bearing in back?? All four of my Toyota RVs have ball-bearing center-supports in the middle of the driveshafts. Are you saying you have one that does not?

As far as the bushing goes, yes there is a standard and oversize available. Not something easily by a "backyard" mechanic.

As I mentioned earlier, all transmissions that I know of, that use slip-yokes to take up the fore and aft movement of the rear axle. will eventually get some wear and leak out the back. You mentioned the idea of using a roller bearing in back instead of a bronze or babbit bushing. Such a bearing would not work because of the fore and after movement.

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any good shop will be able to replace the bushing & seal in 10 minutes after removing the drive shaft out of the way...

Not quite always THAT easy, but I get your point. That bushing is only part of wear area. Often a chronic leaker will also need a new driveshaft yoke. That is not a 10 minute job to change.

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This is a fine example of how conversations get discombobulated : my post #37 was made in reference to post # 36 by shibs.

Where in his last line, he seemed to think that a small leak was OK.... I wanted to say that a small leak is not OK.......but.....

My copy & paste method is obviously not done correctly as it does not appear in a "box" as all others do.

I have no one to show me, so I just do the best I can......pushing buttons & making mistakes

The grand kids who could show me a lot are a 1000+ miles away & I only see them every other year.

Same with photos, I would be glad to post photos if I knew how.....as I said before, I only started learning computer after I closed my shop.

Before, I had someone else to take care of this stuff & I spent very little time on the computer....I know, I should have paid more attention & probably should get a newer phone as the old rotary phone is a hassle when making calls that require "push one" for English :lol: ......donnie

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You are doing fine Donnie :-)

I spend 16 plus hours in front of a monitor some days, not cuz I want to, cuz I have to.

Back on topic:

I am going to swing by the Toyota dealership and ask them for quote on labor, I am curious.

I like my Toyota service guys, but sells guys are rude knuckle heads.

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Does anybody make for a speedy sleeve for the yoke???

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the old rotary phone is a hassle when making calls that require "push one" for English :lol: ......donnie

Hey .. rotary phones are great for some things. Like working in an unheated shop when it's below 0 degrees F. Try using a touch-tone phone with gel-pad buttons to make a phone call when it's that cold and see how far you get. 20 years ago I was trying to find a push-buttom phone to replace my rotary in my barn that would work in the cold like my rotary did. After many failed attempts I called the phone company as asked them how the heck they get pay phones to work so well outdoors. I was told that outdoor payphones use mechanical buttons now called "heavy duty" but share the same technology as the old Princess pushbutton phones. The tech guy told me to start looking at yard sales and buy one and try it. I did. Paid $10 and my Princess phone has worked at 25 below zero. So, I finally unhooked my rotary.

In regard to a "small leak" in the back of the trans being OK or not? Such a small leak is welcome on my GM plow trucks and they all do it. Small amount of oil gets flicked around by the driveshaft and keeps the metal underneath from rusting out. I think every GM 4WD I ever owned with a New Process 208 or 241 Transfercase leaks small amounts of oil from that slip-joint area. My 1978 K5 Blazer with the cast-iron 205 case does not but that is because in the 70s, the back of the trans or transfercase was NOT used as an in-and-out slip joint. A splined joint in the driveshaft was used instead.

Anyway, my point being my GMs have had those small leaks for 20-30 years and never got worse. Not something I want on my Toyota RV though.

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No bearing in back?? All four of my Toyota RVs have ball-bearing center-supports in the middle of the driveshafts. Are you saying you have one that does not?

As far as the bushing goes, yes there is a standard and oversize available. Not something easily by a "backyard" mechanic.

As I mentioned earlier, all transmissions that I know of, that use slip-yokes to take up the fore and aft movement of the rear axle. will eventually get some wear and leak out the back. You mentioned the idea of using a roller bearing in back instead of a bronze or babbit bushing. Such a bearing would not work because of the fore and after movement.

Nothing to do with the drive shaft everything to do with the transmission. I think you are thinking about the governor repair bushing inside the case. The case has no bushing the reamer was used to enlarged the case then a bushing was installed to repair the damage done by the governor rings. I do not know of any oversized tail stock bushing. If the tail stock was trashed by a bad bushing and joke it was replaced. They are not a tight fit a punch will easily drive them out and a seal driver will drive a new one in.

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So as long as we keep the tranny topped off, a little leak on the rear (other than polluting) is not going to harm the tranny.

NO !

Find an independent shop that can replace the bushing WITHOUT removing the extension housing.....There are bushing pullers that can reach in and grab the bushing (they have 4 expanding jaws that will fit over the output shaft & a bolt that contacts the end of the shaft to push on)....any good shop will be able to replace the bushing & seal in 10 minutes after removing the drive shaft out of the way...With the correct tools it is easy.

If you can feel any play when trying to move the yoke, Replace the bushing & seal...FM makes this bushing available in either brass clad or babbit / alloy.....either is fine...Brass will last longer.. When checking for movement, make sure that the trans is not loaded against the parking pawl

if the wheels are on the ground, block them so the truck can't roll & put the trans in neutral

If your shop insists that he has to remove the housing to replace the bushing & seal....Find another shop.......donnie

Next one I'll race you I can have the tail stock off before you find the puller! A puller makes it a bit harder for a back yard'er if he has to go buy one.

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Posted Yesterday, 07:02 PM

Does anybody make for a speedy sleeve for the yoke???Posted Yesterday, 07:02

Does anybody make for a speedy sleeve for the yoke???Posted Yesterday, 07:02 PM NOPE, that didn't work :-) no BOX???

Does anybody make for a speedy sleeve for the yoke???NOPE, neither did that, but your answer appears below

NO, because the sleeve would oversize the OD of the yoke & then it would not fit inside the bushing.
Those sleeves are for yokes that need to be repaired to fit a seal only ....................................................as in the pinion seal, or harmonic balancer on the front of the engine....There are no bushings involved in this area & speedy sleeves can save the day on these 2 places.........Donnie

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Next one I'll race you I can have the tail stock off before you find the puller! A puller makes it a bit harder for a back yard'er if he has to go buy one.

Not me, all I need to do is open a drawer, a shade tree, yep, I'll admit these bushing pullers can't be rented from auto stores.....

I was under the impression that the original poster was looking for a small shop to do the repair....I may be mistaken, too lazy to go back & look

But I finally found out how to get the "box"...my copy & past was more work........Just hit Quote...........DUH..... :blush:

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I can't recall if someone asked about the gov. bore repair sleeve.. I bought the tool from Trans-tool a LONG time ago & they also supplied the sleeves.

They were bought out by Hayden the cooler people & became Hayden-Trans-tool....who then became, I think ATEC Trans -Tool.. Last I bought anything from them was years ago, a few sleeves for the Ford AOD...which came out in 1980.. This was a big $$$ maker for us as these gov. rings wore the cases on 75% of the "drive it until it won't shift crowd". The repair in my shop was probably 20 Fords to 1 A40 series trans....I sold the tools & sleeves when I retired, I still have the bushing pullers & installers for most sizes & a complete seal installer set...

Also anyone looking for bushings for ANYTHING....Omega bushing in Sacramento...will have what you need or CUSTOM MAKE ONE for you.

He saved my bacon many times on weird or rare case's....mostly FWD or transfer boxes with spun bushings or other severe case wear.

...........................donnie

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For awhile now I've had this slight drip of tranny fluid and about 1/8th inch play in the propeller shaft. I took her into the shop today and had the bushing and seal replaced. They gave me the old bushing to show the wear it had. My Toy has 94,000 miles on it and I'm pretty sure the bushing has never been replaced before. I do think the slight leak and play are the signs.

Cheers!

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IMHO if it has a leak replace the bushing and the seal don't take a chance that it might be OK it's not that much more work.

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