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Accessing in tank fuel pump from above. anybody tried?


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#1 hekdic

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 12:26 PM

I've got a Gulfstream Conquest RV with 22RE engine. It needs a new fuel pump. It has a full tank of gas and I don't have any good way to drain it. I'm considering going in from the top. I asked Gulfstream what the construction was there and they said the didn't have anybody that knew how it was put together any mofe. It's open floor area up top and apparently a couple of layers before I get to the tank.

#2 linda s

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 03:02 PM

I've got a Gulfstream Conquest RV with 22RE engine. It needs a new fuel pump. It has a full tank of gas and I don't have any good way to drain it. I'm considering going in from the top. I asked Gulfstream what the construction was there and they said the didn't have anybody that knew how it was put together any mofe. It's open floor area up top and apparently a couple of layers before I get to the tank.

For your safety go buy a siphon and drain the tank. There are wires there and I'm assuming you would cut through with power tools. Don't be careless. My neighbor blew himself up trying to work near a fuel tank that wasn't properly drained and left his wife and young children .
Linda S

#3 90toydolphin

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 05:17 PM

if you do try to drain, fill it with water so there aren't any fumes, the fumes make it a bomb. some have talked her about adding an electric in line unit, think it was for carberated units only. personally i wouldn't mess with a gas tank, save up and have a professional do it, less than buriel costs.


#4 waiter

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 02:17 AM

First, absolutely, positively verify its the pump. jump Fp to B on the service connector, the pump should run.

I can give you a link to the FSM - its a big PDF (85meg) very good step by step for fuel system.

Dropping the tank isn't to big of a deal. Siphon the fuel out (as much as you can). spray the strap bolts with liquid wrench a few days ahead of time. I use a floor jack with a big flat piece of wood to hold the tank in place while I'm undoing bolts. The tank doesn't weigh a lot, don't crush the tank with the jack.

While you have the tank down, consider replacing the filler and filler vent hoses.

If I was welding on the tank, I would fill it with water, but probably not to replace the pump. Before you put the pump back in the tank, do the jumper on Fp and B, and make sure the pump runs.

John Mc
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John Mc
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#5 5Toyota

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 07:11 PM

ALL of the factory tanks of that era have drain plugs there is one on my 1987 DOLPHIN and my 1988 4 wd xtra cab. you can drain in to a clean spouted oil drainer drain into gas cans but be very careful.I replaced my hoses this spring with half a tank of gas. nothing came out but the fumes were horable indeed . I would only do the job outside.

#6 waiter

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 05:27 AM

5Yoyota brings up an excellent point, WELL VENTILATED AREA. I would also add no sparks, i.e. light switches, drop lights, etc.

John Mc
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#7 hekdic

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 06:03 PM

Thanks to everybody who replied. I measured everything carefully and laid out where the access should be to get to the pump. It was in the area where there is a table in my RV and about even with the edge of the seats on that side and was a clear area. Recon indicated that the floor had about 2 in of clear air between the top and bottom of the floor. So far so good but when I ran a stud finder over the area I got mixed messages and couldn't find a clear area that matched where I felt I should be and some locals said that the tank wouldn't be that hard to drop. Don't believe them.

I had to take a few days to meet another obligation and just got the tank out today. Not having a big lift, the room to maneuver was not much and every fitting was a yyyy to get to. In my rig the rear of the tank is almost against the rear axle housing and right up against the right frame rail. The fuel hose to to line connection was binding and clearances were such that it was a half a flat on the wrench at a time and because of access, just about all the force I could put on the wrenches. It took all afternoon just for that fitting. I've done a good bit of wrenching and that's the first flare nut that I've had that didn't come out easy once you broke it free.

Is the fuel tank and all it's garbage standard Toyota or do mfr's do different things? Do the standard pump and sending unit fit or does the 1 ton take something else?

At least I"m on the downhill slide now.

Dick

#8 Derek up North

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 06:26 PM

I don't remember anyone mentioning that it wasn't a standard 17.2 gallon Toyota tank and pump.

#9 hekdic

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 11:02 AM

Thanks a lot. By the way, it was mentioned that I should drain the tank before I started from the top. It should be noted that a full tank is less dangerous than an almost empty tank. There is a certain air/fuel ratio that's required for flammability. It's possible to toss a lighted cigarette into a pail of gasoline if you're lucky. With the modern tank where any vapors are directed to the charcoal canister up front, it is due careful consideration not to pierce it but it's not the bomb that an almost empty tank is. Generally, it's a tank that hasn't been totally drained and cleaned to remove all traces of fuel that's the real problem. Then you get careless.

Dick

#10 skydancer2992

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 06:02 PM

My 1985 Toyota 4Runner had an access plate below the rear passenger seat. I unscrewed five bolts and I was looking at the top of the fuel tank and the assembly that holds the fuel pump in the tank.

This access made a fuel pump swap a 30 minute job. Like you, I believe it is safer to work with the tank full than with vapors.

Looking at my Toyota camper, I'm pondering about fashioning a similar hatch to make the fuel pump more accessible.




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