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popeye

What Are The Green Wire Connectors Called

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Hi, I have a 1983 Sunrader (22R) and one of the green plastic wire connectors near the battery terminal is broken. There are more of these types of connectors throughout the wiring harness. Does anyone know what these are called? Are they fusible links? Autozone has no clue! Thanks in advance.

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Which battery? 'Starting' or 'house'? A picture would help, if you can post one.

"Autozone has no clue!" I'm not surprised!

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need more info

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Yep a picture sure would help. Likely as not it's not a fuse link Toyota was not big on fuse links.

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The piece I'm inquiring about is the green plastic cylindrical connector the arrow is pointing to. Thanks

post-7670-0-82822700-1395061895_thumb.jp

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Derek thanks for your input, but do you know what these are called? I need to order a replacement.

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If you cant find a replacement you could try a junk yard

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I think its just a connector.

JOhn Mc

88 Dolphin 4 Auto

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I agree with John.

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If it is a fuse link it will have a small wire with out strands and strange insolation (does not burn) you can buy fuse wire but it will have to be for rated current auto parts stores will have them. The gauge of wire it is connected to will give you a clue of rated current. The green connector is some thing Toyota used to make it easy to replace Toyota got away from them many years ago and just used body fuses in the fuse panel box.I guess the question is what does not work? They generally were used for fairly high current.

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Thanks for the input. So if I understand this correctly, I should replace the failed connector and wire with a fusible link wire. The green connector doesn't matter.

If it is a fusible link, when the wire became disconnected, I had no power to the vehicle at all, therefore this wire must carry a pretty good load (as Maineah mentioned). I have seen different posts in other forums listing the FL rating at 60a or 80a.

Edited by popeye

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You should have 2 links. One for your main fuse panel and one for your headlights.

Replace with fuse links only.

You can get them at AutoZone in the electric section.

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Are you saying that your headlites are fused? If the fuse blows, you are driving in the dark???????????????????Donnie

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Usually if the fuse links burn the truck would stop yes you'll lose your head lights but it would not matter much if your not moving! If it's a body fuse link it will be 60 amps I think the 80 were for the diesels. Yes you can just join in a fuse wire just be sure your connections are good enough to stand the load.

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Are you saying that your headlites are fused? If the fuse blows, you are driving in the dark???????????????????Donnie

A fuseable link is actually a short piece of wire usually 4 American wire gage smaller than the wire its protecting. I.E. 12 gage wire would be protected by a 16 gage fuseable link. This "link" melts at a lower current, protecting the circuit. The links are usually enclosed by a special high temperature cover. A link unlike a fuse would have to heat to melting before it closed the circuit.

I use 14 awg links for both lights and fuse block.

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IMHO, a 'fusible link' is just a 'fuse' in a less convenient, more difficult to change form. They should have just called it a 'PITA fuse'. :)

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IMHO, a 'fusible link' is just a 'fuse' in a less convenient, more difficult to change form. They should have just called it a 'PITA fuse'. :)

Actually, its not. A fuse will blow instantly if zapped by excess current. A fuseable link is more like a "slow blow fuse". It only melts when subjected to high current for a prolonged time.

Can you imagine driving down the road and have all your electric shut down from a brief electric surge? That's what would happen if you had a regular fuse vs a fuse link.

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It was a short lived ideal that every one used they were every where and often failed with out reason and some times started fires. When shorted they became little toaster elements until they burn out. The trend now is body fuses with smaller branch circuits. It was a cheap way to protect wiring no fuse boxes and they could be put any where.

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I realize that if the body fuse / fuse link pops..you will lose ALL power thus the headlites too.

What I thought the poster was saying that the headlites are fused.....thus my question

To the best of my knowledge, the headlamp switch has an internal breaker that will keep the headlights flashing on & off if there is a DIRECT short to ground anywhere in the headlamp circuit..so you are not without lights if a fault occurs in the lamp circuit............that's all, donnie

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I realize that if the body fuse / fuse link pops..you will lose ALL power thus the headlites too.

What I thought the poster was saying that the headlites are fused.....thus my question

To the best of my knowledge, the headlamp switch has an internal breaker that will keep the headlights flashing on & off if there is a DIRECT short to ground anywhere in the headlamp circuit..so you are not without lights if a fault occurs in the lamp circuit............that's all, donnie

Often European head lamps were but with two different circuits so you would only lose one.

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My toy is an older home. 1978 chassis with 79 body.

I have a fuse link between the battery (+) and the headlight circuit. I also have one from battery (+) to the fuse block. I believe the idea was to separate the two circuits in the event of a current overload shutting everything down. I.e. You could loose main power but lights still work and visa-versa.

The newer models probably have a different setup than mine.

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