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Gary, if the bushing that you are showing in your photo is the one that was replaced in your trans, I would be suspicious that the yoke has some wear also. Was the yoke replaced? Or just polished? Are you still experiencing a LEAK ?........If you have no leak now & the unit is shifting correctly..YOU ARE LUCKY..donnie

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Donnie - they looked at the yoke and checked the driveshaft. All is good, no leaks and the tranny always shifted great. Just me doing my checks for leaks and giving the driveshaft a shake.

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My 86 Sunrader just lost reverse, basically it is just like being in neutral, just revs up nothing happens. I got it to lurch kind of jump backwards with a bad noise once, pulled into a camp spot, but that was it, no more backing up. First thing I need to know is where is the trans ID tag located ? Can I get a unit from a wrecking yard that was in a Toyota car that would fit in? What are my options?

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Lee & Joan - I'm going to assume that since you posted your question over two months ago that you've already had your trans issue resolved, but to answer your question, if you have a 22R/RE, the A40D out of a Celica or Corona ('81-'85) will work, but your driveshaft might be a couple inches too short. The A43D behind a 22R is only found in trucks, but your bellhousing could be substituted to an A43D out of a Supra or Cressida that used an M series engine.

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I would like to add that the A43D planetary gears are larger than planets in an A40.... in addition no what others have said about length etc.

The A43D was beefed up for trucks.............donnie

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I should also add that stall speed & torque ratios...I.E. Impellar & turbine fin angle & stator multiplication ratios are vastly different between lightweight cars & much heavier trucks....All converters may look the same on the outside, but there are MAJOR differences on the inside ...donnie

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I should also add that stall speed & torque ratios...I.E. Impellar & turbine fin angle & stator multiplication ratios are vastly different between lightweight cars & much heavier trucks....All converters may look the same on the outside, but there are MAJOR differences on the inside ...donnie

Same non-lockup torque-converter is used for the A43D and some A40s in pickup trucks as well as some Celicas and Corollas. Same stall speed, 6 pad mount, and 1.25" pilot stub.

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I know the A40D isn't as strong as the A43D, but if in a pinch, which is kinda what I was assuming from the OP...

I'm building an A43D for my Corona wagon with a higher stall converter, better clutches, modified valve body... The stock A40D doesn't like the built 2xR hybrid's increased power!

jdemaris - I have found info saying there are some stock converters with different stall speeds depending on the application, although stall speed is relative to torque, and a 2 or 3TC in a Corolla doesn't have near the torque of a 20R, which has less than an early 22R, which has less than a later 22RE, and much less than a 5M, which all use an A4x_ trans.

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I looked into changing the stall speed on my 22re with A43D trannie after getting stuck in the mountains one time. Turns out that change would increase the heat in the transmission by a lot and heat is death to the A43d trannie especially with so much weight we have

Linda S

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Linda, you are correct in stating that increasing the stall speed of a converter will increase heat, but changing the stall / torque ratio will not create more heat. These are changes that are seldom addressed except by converter builders.. Maris makes no mention of anything else except the stall speed, mounting pad configuration & the pilot hub dia He seems to think that there are no internal differences inside the torque converter, which is normal thinking for someone who is not in the industry.. "If it fits-it ships" is general knowledge......the buzz word, even among sales people who sell converters is STALL SPEED....... there is a hell of a lot more engineering inside a converter than a few extra parts... After building converters for 20+ years I do feel qualified to discuss this in detail if any one cares....... Motorhome or drag car....Ask your sales person the next time you order a converter "what is the stall torque ratio of the converter that you are buying & watch the blank stares. You will get "you mean stall speed?" Back to you Linda: you mentioned getting stuck in the mountains...... what exactly happened? I'm guessing that you did not have the power to pull a steep grade, if this is correct, you need to increase your stall torque ratio & not your stall speed Maris is out to lunch if he thinks that you can install a converter & trans from a Corolla into a 5,000 pound motor home and make it all the way to the dance & BACK.....................donnie

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Maris makes no mention of anything else except the stall speed, mounting pad configuration & the pilot hub dia He seems to think that there are no internal differences inside the torque converter, which is normal thinking for someone who is not in the industry.. ....donnie

That sounds like a bit of hyperbole or nonsense to me. Define "not in the industry" please. I've been in the repair industry for 50 years. I've also worked in a shop that did, in-house torque-converter rebuilding. Both the big ones that are bolted together and the smaller automotive ones that are welded together. With the latter - we'd cut them apart, replace what was needed, weld back together, and balance them.

I made a few simple general statements. One is that Toyota sometimes used the same torque converter in some cars, bare pickups, and dual-wheel motorhomes when it comes to the A43D and the 22RE. One torque converter - direct from Toyota - that fit them all. Toyota parts verifies that. So do my OEM Toyota transmission manuals. Yet you say it is not true and I guess, I'm either "ill informed" or lack experience??

Torque converters are usually marked with a combo of marks, numbers, colored dots, etc. so you can tell what they are when removing.

Also on the subject of truck transmissions versus car transmissions. Sometimes same basic model transmissions have huge differences. One example is the 700R4/4L60 series from GM. When used in some cars and small trucks like S10s - some parts are lighter duty and some clutch disks are left out. NOT the situation with the A43D. I've seen no variation in parts when it comes to the clutches, planet-pinion, etc. regardless if used in a small Toyota car or a dual-wheel box truck or motorhome.

On the subject of stall speeds - Toyota (Aisin) offers low, medium and high stall speed converters for the A43D. Seems to me the higher the better when it comes to a Toyota motorhome with a low-torque 22RE. Not unless you get rid of the 4.10 to 1 rear and up the ratio numbers. My 1988 - with a 22RE and at a dead stop on a very steep hill - could barely get moving again from 1st gear. That's when it had a 4.10. Has a 4.56 to 1 now which makes it much better. Year's back - Chevy had a mess with gas powered K5 Blazers and TH350 transmissions and low stall-speed torque converters. Put the Blazer on a very steep hill in low - and stop - and it would not be able to get moving again. But unlike my 1988 Toyota RV, most Blazers were 4WD and had dual-range transfercases. So all had to be done was shift the case into low gear.

To be fair - even some manual transmission rigs had the same problem. Point of clutch engagement is similar to torque-converter stall-speed. I had a brand-new 1987 Nissan Sentra that was an el-cheap "special" for $5700 brand new. Came with a 4 speed man. trans instead of a 5 speed. I found out quick that on a steep hill - it would not go. No matter how I slipped the clutch and rev the engine - it would stall. We found out the first week we had it when we tried to stay at a motel that had the parking lot on the 2nd floor and we had to drive up a ramp. We could not do it. I suspect had the car had the 5 speed - 1st gear would of been lower and it would not have been an issue.

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Here is one example of one converter direct from Toyota fitting several cars and trucks. This is the correct one - according to Toyota - for my 1988 dual-wheel Minicruiser with a 22RE and A43D.

post-6578-0-32317800-1446146976_thumb.jp

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Do they make special torque converters (heavy duty ones) for RVs?

I remember reading you could have beefier torque converter make (????) what are the advantages of a beefier torque converter?

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Do they make special torque converters (heavy duty ones) for RVs?

I remember reading you could have beefier torque converter make (????) what are the advantages of a beefier torque converter?

There are many companies that make HD torque-converters for trucks and RVs that have "lock-up" torque-converters. The lock-up clutch is the weak-link that often does them in when used hard in "lock-up" mode. Not an issue with a Toyota A43D that has no lock-up clutch. I suppose that's why Toyota left it out when used in trucks made to work hard. Conventional torque-converter failures are very rare. They certainly can fail after a trans goes bad and all the debris goes though the converter. It also why no reputable trans rebuilder will warranty a transmission unless the torque-converter is cut apart and checked out - or replaced.

There are a few torque-converters that had weak design. Like GM used on 80s diesel that only had three bolt-mounts and lugs. So a GM 6.2 diesel came with three bolts and lugs holding the torque-converter on - yet a little Toyota A43D up against a four-cylinder gas engine has six bolts and lugs. In the case of the GMs - you could buy upgraded 6 lug torque-converters.

I'm not aware of any complaints or upgrades with any of the torque-converters used OEM for the A43D. That being said - Toyota increased the size of it over the years (for the A40 series). Previa van with the A43D had a 10.3" diameter converter. 1976-1995 Cressida, Supra, Celica, Corolla, and pickup trucks used 10.5" diameter converters. Around 1995 - Toyota started used even bigger 11.3" converters in some trucks with A43D transmissions.

I've got a 2002 Chevy Tracker 4WD with a V6 engine and a A43D electronic-controlled lock-up version. It has nearly 300K miles on it and the trans/converter is original. I find that pretty impressive.

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OK Maris, here is a hypothetical for you: Customer brings you a S10 pick up with a 4 or 500 hp engine, running nitrous. Engine stalls at 4 grand right where his power band is. He's happy with that. His rear axle ratio is correct as he hits the traps at the desired RPM.

But his 60 foot time sux, he sits there burning his 16" slicks and watching the tail lights of the guy beside him leaving. He comes to you for help what would you do? ....................................donnie

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(you said you see no variation in parts when it comes to clutches, planets, or etc. Regardless if used in a small Toyota car or dual wheel box truck or motor home.)

I would like to note a few facts concerning the above statement. The 3 speed A40 with SMALL planetary gears was used in cars made up to August 1981. Then Toyota changed some seal rings and made changes to the SMALL planetary gear. They now call this the A41. In some trucks you will find an A43 which is the A41 with LARGE planetary gears. Their first 4 speed transmission goes back to the basic A40 with an overdrive stuck on the front. Toyota now calls this the A40D. D meaning overdrive. The A43D has LARGER planetary gears. Then Toyota wanted a lock-up clutch so they added one to the A43D and called it the A43DL. As you might have guessed L means lock-up. Toyota also had a A42DL. These have SMALL planetary gears. In 1986 Toyota engineers changed the overdrive gear ratio and gave the transmission a new name. The A45DL. I could go on and on but I think you get my point. If you are still thinking "if it fits it ships" maybe this info will help you understand that All parts are not the same

.......................................donnie.

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(you said you see no variation in parts when it comes to clutches, planets, or etc. Regardless if used in a small Toyota car or dual wheel box truck or motor home.)

If you are still thinking "if it fits it ships" maybe this info will help you understand that All parts are not the same

.......................................donnie.

I don't know what sort of point you are trying to make. I never said there were "no" differences between different model transmissions - did I? My comment was about one model - the A43D. Also where does this " if it ships it will fit" nonsense come from? Certainly not from me. If you are somehow trying to speak "down to me" and "educate me" - I'm waiting for you to tell me something I don't already know. Or point out some specific fact I've stated that is incorrect. You are the one who has made some incorrect statements here about A43D torque converters. As to that - Toyota Company does not agree you. Maybe you need to contact them and give them some "education."

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Geez Maris, I didn't know that you were a converter builder too,, "If it fits-it ships" was meant to be a response to your claim that if the Toyota book says it fits.........they will ship it....no more no less... Myself I don't buy converters, I build them... I don't care what the Toyota book offers, if they offer only 3 then it must be so.. I'm not disputing that. .Did you ever stop & think what could be done to the converter to give you a bit more "stuff" when you are out of power on a steep hill? This is what I mean by building converters, not just cutting them open & replacing parts. But designing the modifications needed to remedy a situation....sure, I agree that dropping the rear end ratio is a Good remedy...but we are speaking torque converter here, NO???

POST # 67...I offered you a hypothetical situation that we builders often run into....If you were / are a converter builder...I wonder why you glazed right over that post... You have had time now to do some research...wanna give it a go?????????????........................

I was kinda thinking that you would jump right on it................................donnie

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I hate to even attempt this as to suffer the ire of both of you. Donnie, sometimes you have to parse the words that are written. Sort of like, up to 50% off. What was stated was the he worked in a shop that did converter rebuilding without any other details. Look I worked someplace that did brain surgery. Spent 6 months working at a hospital. As a electronics specialist, I even was called to go into operating rooms to swap out gear that would act up. Often times in the middle of surgery. The experience gave me quite a bit of insight into many medical things. However, it doesn't make me a brain surgeon. See what I mean? This is not meant to disparage anyone. It is just that I see many posts go off the rails where someone says that this person said this or that. Then I read the post further and it is not exactly what they said.

JDE, I don't know specifically what your resume holds but certainly you have a deep basis of knowledge in the mechanical field. Forgive me if I parse only one sentence to illustrate my point. In addition to indicating you worked at a shop that performed converter rebuilding you also used "we'd cut them apart". It does leave the door open as to the what exactly the we part of the statement means.

I try to follow along when possible. Learn a great deal and have a great deal of respect for those with knowledge I don't have. This is the internet though. “Doveryai, no proveryai.” Reagan

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OK Maris, here is a hypothetical for you: Customer brings you a S10 pick up with a 4 or 500 hp engine, running nitrous. Engine stalls at 4 grand right where his power band is. He's happy with that. His rear axle ratio is correct as he hits the traps at the desired RPM.

But his 60 foot time sux, he sits there burning his 16" slicks and watching the tail lights of the guy beside him leaving. He comes to you for help what would you do? ....................................donnie

Donnie, please continue. I know a lot about auto transmissions and understand stall speed, but don't have the answer to your example (although I think I know most of the answer).

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Now my input.

With my '81 Corona wagon with an A40D trans (currently), I've added an inline filter (spin on, Ford type - Purolator 30001, NAPA/Wix 51515, Fram (heaven forbid) PH8a...) on the hot side of the cooler line (hot fluid filters better), then through a huge aftermarket cooler, then through the factory radiator cooler. I've had many people tell me that it should go through the factory cooler first, but my reasoning is that in cold weather, the factory cooler can actually warm the fluid, as 170 seems to be the ideal temp for trans fluid. Colder, it doesn't have the correct flow rate, and warmer begins excess wear. This car has towed many other RWD Celicas, Coronas, a utility trailer, a couple Mk I Supras, and a Cressida, and with a built 22R has been severely abused, but with probably 350,000 miles, still works great!!!

BTW, I use the same Purolator filter on the engine, and on the 1UZ in my Lexus. I always figure that if I can fit a bigger filter, use it!

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Donnie, please continue. I know a lot about auto transmissions and understand stall speed, but don't have the answer to your example (although I think I know most of the answer).

The answer that I was looking for was a stator replacement. since the pickup is lighter in the rear, getting the engine torque to the asphalt can be a problem.. I am assuming that all other criteria has been addressed....That includes rear end geometry, weight transfer, axle ratio, tire size & rubber compound etc. etc............in other words all that can be done other than the converter has been done...AND, since we were talking CONVERTER, I would opt for a stator change.. Some others may not agree, sure you can go to another set of Diff gears, alter tire pressure or change rubber compound and on & on...BUT WE WERE TALKING CONVERTER.....so I would like a SOFTER launch....

Since the early 1980's... the converter of choice for street / strip cars has been the GM FWD 10inch converter....some builders call it a 9 1/2"

because that is the turbine size.....And smaller is better..huh? Everyone recalls the 8" Opal. Almost everyone is using that core.....it was used in all FWD GM cars with the 125------thru the 440. or from the 2.0L engine to the 3.8 v6 & cores are EVERYWHERE & CHEEP>

There are 8 different Impellers, about 1/2 of them can be identified by a single digit # stamped near the hub..If there is no # available the the fin angle must be determined by the builder......There are 4 positive & 4 negative angles.. There are also 5 different stators & these ARE numbered...

Using this core,STR'S or torque multiplication ratios are available in many options from about 1:66 to 2:70 with many variables in between. Also Billet fronts, & heat treated turbine centers, flanged hubs, steel srtators & everything else that is needed to build what you need is available

Hope this makes sense & is readable as my monitor screen is heading south Big fade in the center..& I can just barely see what I am typing

.....................................................................................donnie

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Yep I remember Vega converters were the hot lick lasted for a few races! Interesting device goes from a torque amp to a fluid coupling.

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