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WME

Toyota Advanced Member
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Everything posted by WME

  1. This is the Bilstein shock for your Toy...https://www.shockwarehouse.com/site/product.cfm/id/14571/name/Bilstein-B6-4600-Heavy-Duty-Shock-Absorber-Toyota-Pickup-Front-24-184830 Its got a single nut(with jam nut) on the top. The bottom of shock uses a cross bar that is held on with 2 bolts
  2. WAG...The Master Cylinder is all thats left. If you were losing fluid I'd also suspect the vacuum booster.
  3. Current item...https://www.amazon.com/BiXPower-Charger-Interchangeable-Connectors-Computers/dp/B00ODA6DNQ
  4. At this point in time, just order a set of right hand thread, studs and bolts. They will work just fine, the 87 up Toys had right hand threads all the way around.
  5. ^^ What he said about pure sine
  6. From the school of hard knocks Get some Reflectix for the windows to reduce heat gain cut to fit...https://www.homedepot.com/p/Reflectix-24-in-x-25-ft-Double-Reflective-Insulation-Roll-BP24025/100318553 Coat the roof with Kool Seal, to reduce heat gain...https://www.pplmotorhomes.com/search?categoryId=&query=Kool+seal Do not use Aluminum color roof coat. There are new H.E roof ACs for RV that will use much less power than the original units...https://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/rv-appliances/air-conditioner/air-conditioners-coleman-dometic/coleman-mach-iii-pwr-savr_63152. If you have a proper 30 amp power cord, replace the 15 amp plug with a proper 30 amp plug...https://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/electrical-plumbing-lp-gas/rv-electrical-systems-and-accessories/plugs-connectors/power-grip-30a-rpl-plugb_55-8543 If somebody replaced the power cord with a 15 amp extension power cord get a 30 cord and plug. If the new AC trips your 20 amp breaker you may need an HACR type breaker...https://www.homedepot.com/p/Square-D-Homeline-20-Amp-Single-Pole-Circuit-Breaker-HOM120CP/100045009
  7. On a 1-10 scale 1=easy, 10=hard. Oil change =1, rebuild engine =9.5... Shocks =3, rear brakes=5. A rear brake kit is lots of parts, there are several rear brake redo posts here that list the part numbers. Basic parts are brake shoes, rear brake cylinders, inner and outer bearings, inner and outer seals. Removing the axle shafts will teach you many new words of the 4 letter variety, read and learn, save your self a lot of grief.
  8. A 78 would have had 5 bolt fronts and a wide L60x14 rear or foolies. I'm not exactly sure of the oldest trucks date, but the later 6/6 brake rotor will fit on the standard 5 bolt spindle, IF the truck has torsion bar front springs. So who knows what has happened to this old toy.
  9. The early trucks used a 5/6 adapter, later trucks used a 6/6 adapter Here is a 6/6...http://toyotamotorhome.org/forums/index.php?/topic/9266-rare-find-dually-front-hubs/
  10. What you have done is WAY safer than the original set up. Although it is not as good as the 1 ton axle. Why?? Age/condition of your OEM axles, flat tires and crosswinds. A sorta safety scale. Original set up. 50%...Your set up 85-90%... A 1 ton 100%
  11. Its mostly your butt on the line. Most of use get nervous at 10 year old tires. Reality is 12-14 years is probably OK for local stuff, I would be nervous about going to Baja or the East coast. Occasionally driving the Rv and warming up the tires will redistribute oils in the tire and the tire will last MUCH longer than just being parked. FWIW I just did did the big bite on my Winnebago this winter for the now COVID 19 cancelled, leaf peeping trip this fall. The in use tires were 11 years old and had 50% wear and 21k mi. The outer tires were starting to show micro sidewall cracks. Tires for Toyota's are one of the big deals, $$ vs $$$$ for my Winnebago. Check the age/condition of your spare, use one of your in use tires as a spare if its better. My spare was 17 years old and had never been on the ground
  12. O'reilly's and Auto Zone have loaner tools. Check for a slide hammer. A pull every couple of inches will do a lot to bring things together. You can pull aluminum or steel, but not fiberglass.
  13. Find the valve for the air bags, let all the air out and measure the rear bumper. Put 80 psi in the bags and measure the rear bumper. If the bumper comes up and the rear is level then your air bags are OK. If they bleed down over a few days the problem is likely air hose/fittings leaking. Soapy water will help find the leak. Sway problems can be caused by many things. Worn rear leaf springs bushings, worn shocks, no rear sway bar. Start with air bags, shocks. With what the labor is for the spring bushings you should think hard about new springs if you do the bushings. A sway bar is down the list, there are many Toy MHs that came from the factory with out a rear sway bar.
  14. Here ya go, EVERYTHING you wanted to know about your heater. https://techsupport.pdxrvwholesale.com/technical-service-manuals/suburban-nt-12se/
  15. Linda"s got the right idea. Remove the window and frame carefully, remove the trim and add water. Put the window on a piece of news paper so any water will show up instantly. Some of the "leaks" on the inside the windows is actually condensation from the occupants at night.
  16. The rubber trim that has pulled away in the corners is NOT the seal. The sealing is behind the glass. Its usually a urethane glue. The butyl tape failed a long time ago and somebody "fixed" it with tube of sillycone. Time to strip it out and do it right
  17. LED flasher...They come in many pin counts 2,3,4,6,7,9 . Find your flasher and remove it from the fuse panel and see how many pin/tabs it has. Go to Ebay or your parts store and get a LED replacement. A 3 pin example with adapter https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-Pin-Car-Flasher-Relay-Fix-LED-Turn-Signal-Light-Hyper-Flash-For-CF13-CF14/181808780856?fits=Make%3AToyota&hash=item2a54a5d638:g:tPYAAOSwnhldlNYZ
  18. Resistors will work, but it is easier to just get a LED rated flasher. Just match the pins on yours to the new flasher.
  19. Bilsteins are the best, period. But they are designed for control, not especially for ride quality. They are standard on many high end motor coaches. Part of the harshness is just going from worn out shocks to a new control shock. Bilsteins have a life time warranty and they stand behind it and have rebuilt shocks that they no longer make . IMHO for most of us the KYBs are the bang for the buck shock. On our older coaches the rest of the suspension needs to be up to snuff. 90% of them still have OEM rubber bushings. After 20+ years they are shot. What happens when you hit a big bump the the spring eye moves and bangs into the shackle, then the shackle moves and bangs in to the frame. THEN the spring starts to flex. All the banging and clanging make for a harsh ride. With good bushings the springs move immediately when the RV hits a bump. Even with the stiffer poly bushings the overall ride is much improved over worn bushings and the sway is greatly reduced.
  20. LED interior lights easy peasy. just make sure about the color temp you want. Daylight or soft white. Marker lights also easy LED turn signals, you need to change the flasher. The LED s don't draw enough current for it to work right. Proper LED headlights are not cheap and the cheap ones have a bad pattern. A LED discussion here...http://toyotamotorhome.org/forums/index.php?/topic/11786-led-headlights/
  21. You need to post model number. You may need to go to a universal style.
  22. The ONLY reasons to replace the shackles is the holes are elongated or you want to increase/decrease the the rear ride height. New bushings, poly is best, but new rubber is better than old rubber. Maybe new bolts if corrosion has done it thing.
  23. Yes on the diodes. You can use one of the switched relays through the diodes to trigger the relays for each of the 4 lights. Don't run all 4 lights through 1 relay, well it would probably work OK but its better to share the load.
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