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Coffee Drinkers - What are you using?


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I sound about the same. I have a hard time doing anything more skill than opening my eyes until I've had my coffee. I like KISS coffee. I keep a big bucket of Maxwell House next to my drip coffee maker. I can almost make coffee in my sleep, though I have occasionally poured the milk into the sugar bowl. :)

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I sound about the same. I have a hard time doing anything more skill than opening my eyes until I've had my coffee. I like KISS coffee. I keep a big bucket of Maxwell House next to my drip coffee maker. I can almost make coffee in my sleep, though I have occasionally poured the milk into the sugar bowl. :)

Yeah I some times put the brewed coffee in the fridge and leave the milk out and then wonder what I did with it.

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If you want decent coffee start with a Melitta "kit" from the grocery store and find a local specialty roasting house near you. Buy no more coffee than you can consume in a week. By fresh roasted whole beans (not ground).

If you do not want to spend $100 +/- on a good quality entry level electric grinder pick up a Kyocera CM-50 or Hario Skerton hand mill (CM-50 and Skerton are the same grinder, sold under different brand names so either one will be the same). These are NOT inexpensive hand grinders but they are about 1/2 of what a good budged electric will cost you AND as a bonus you can take it AND your Melitta along when you travel so you can enjoy good coffee everywhere.

going this route you will have around $15 in the Melitta dripper and filters and $50 in your grinder but you will also have very good tasting coffee too.

Whatever you do, don't forego the grinder as you don't want to use pre-ground coffee if you can avoid it.

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Until AFTER I've had my first coffees, I don't trust myself operating anything that is capable of accidentally grinding body parts. Generally, nothing sharper than a teaspoon. :)

But I do have a couple of Melittas somewhere under the counter for use when there's a power outage AND the generator won't start. Water heated on an alcohol fueled fondue burner.

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If you want decent coffee start with a Melitta "kit" from the grocery store and find a local specialty roasting house near you. Buy no more coffee than you can consume in a week. By fresh roasted whole beans (not ground).

If you do not want to spend $100 +/- on a good quality entry level electric grinder pick up a Kyocera CM-50 or Hario Skerton hand mill (CM-50 and Skerton are the same grinder, sold under different brand names so either one will be the same). These are NOT inexpensive hand grinders but they are about 1/2 of what a good budged electric will cost you AND as a bonus you can take it AND your Melitta along when you travel so you can enjoy good coffee everywhere.

going this route you will have around $15 in the Melitta dripper and filters and $50 in your grinder but you will also have very good tasting coffee too.

Whatever you do, don't forego the grinder as you don't want to use pre-ground coffee if you can avoid it.

OK I guess that answers my question about the grinder it does make sense. I agree with Derek some thing electric maybe dangerous in the wrong hands. On and off for years I have looked for old grinders with out much success and any thing up here in the woods is not close. Some thing that resembles a coffee roster is 50 miles away so maybe the next trip to the big city I'll look for a grinder. Got to ask super market beans? at least they are no more than a 1/2 hour ride.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hey turtle (or anyone with an opinion), what's your opinion on paper vs stainless for a filter? I could experiment and see which I like better, but I drink coffee so rarely...

I have a french press (so no paper obviously) and an aeropress, and that's it in my camper. I have all the paper filters the aeropress came with, but I also bought the stainless filter, figuring "why waste paper when I can use the stainless filter forever?" But there were some reviews on Amazon claiming better taste with the paper filters. And some reviews saying the opposite...

What's your take on the compromise between what the paper takes out of the finished cup, good and bad?

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Paper vs permanent filters? I've got to wonder if those claiming to taste a difference if it was a blind taste test? I've had a number of drip machines where I've switched to using a permanent filter (gold plated, no less!) and I can't say I ever noticed a different taste.

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I kind of wonder about that. I don't have the refined palate a lot of people have.

I believe people (most of the time) when they claim to be able to taste differences, but I usually can't. But just because I can't pick out the different tastes in wine or coffee, doesn't mean other people can't.

There was a time when I would not have been able to tell you the difference between the taste of hops, malt and yeast in a beer. It just tasted like beer...some tasted different than others, and I knew which ones I liked and which ones I didn't. But I couldn't have told you why. But after brewing for a while, I could pick out all those differences.

Of course that's different than being able to tell if they brewed it just using "finishing hops" added for just the last few minutes of a boil, or if it was "dry hopped". That's a way finer distinction...Not a perfect analogy but still.

Obviously the paper is soaking up some of the oils, and probably other things which would pass right through a metal filter. So I believe there's a difference. But for someone with my unrefined coffee palate...not sure if it matters. Like wine, for me there's coffee which is good, bad, and average. If it's a good cup of coffee, it probably won't stand out to me whether it was filtered with metal or paper.

But still...

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I love the idea of being in Italy, walking somewhere downtown, and stepping up to an espresso bar, drinking a shot in a few sips, then moving on your way. No fuss, no big deal. Just getting a nice strong shot of caffeine in a small, strong tasty drink.

I definitely compare really dark chocolate (about the only kind I eat...usually 80% or stronger) to good, strong black coffee (with maybe just a tiny bit of sugar added).

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Ah yes...and I plan to do all those things when I pass through there later this summer. Maybe not the nude cycling, but all the other stuff, including overnighting near breweries. Probably July, though.

I wish my friend was still in Port Townsend, but she has friends there still so I can connect with them if I want.

But most places aren't set up like that. Definitely not Montana. I mean I could go to an espresso place and order a shot, but it's not the same.

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My ideal of a shot of coffee involves good whisky.

If it wasn't for whiskey I wouldn't even be a coffee drinker. Never liked it until I worked in a bar where the bartender made the most amazing Irish coffee.

Linda S

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In my part of the world, some of the best coffee is Vashon Ferry Coffee, best made and poured immediately into a large 2 qt thermos and shared with friends---7 cups freshly brewed hot coffee + 3/4 cup kahlua + 3/4 cup dark rum and a little vanilla extract. This is about 1 1/2 tablespoons kuklua and 1 1/2 tablespoons dark rum per cup of coffee if you want to make it by the cup or in smaller portions. I personally like to add a small dollop of whipped cream.... This is especially tasty on drizzly days, of which we have many or when the wind is howling.

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Hey Karin: Anytime...let me know, I'll put a pot on. I've got one of those stovetop espresso makers like Linda...between espresso and flavorings, we'd be flying. Or, we could join up for the wooden boat festival in Port Townsend.... I think it is Sept 5.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Kettle on stove top and Starbucks instant coffee, I'm lazy in the am. I have an aero press (link in above post) makes great coffee, but Starbucks instant is so simple - no parts, or cleaning required!

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The main marina, Boat Haven, in Port Townsend is a good place for boondockers to shower, wash clothes, do a few dishes and they have a special dump facility for porta-potties too. This map shows locations of the various marina facilities. As of now there are no coded locks on the doors for those services so that means open to all the public. The showers are great, tons of water pressure, good and hot, about $1.00 in quarters will do it. Plenty of overnight parking on streets next to the marina. Plus there is a big 24/7 park and ride nearby as well as grocery, brewery, cafes, espresso, McDonalds and hardware stores as well as propane. There is a coffee bean roasting place at the Marina but I myself don't care much for their beans. The Safeway grocery store across the street has whole beans of better quality.

If I am going to boon dock right in Port Townsend that is the neighborhood I use.

Wandering around the boat yard is great fun too. The big marine lift brings in all sorts or boats for repairs ranging from larger fishing vessels to historic wooden ships on down to small sail bloats. Good Kayaking and the marina is right on an extensive bike trail system too.

http://www.portofpt.com/BHmap-11-2013.pdf

Wonderful information, I live in Shelton, and work in the Silverdale area so Port Townsend is basically in my backyard. Sounds like a great weekend trip

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  • 1 year later...

We tried a French press, but found that it used too much water to clean. Same with a percolator. We finally settled on a single cup Melitta drip w/ #2 paper filters. Filter and coffee go in the trash, and we save both water and grey water storage. Two scoops for the first cup, add one more for the second - both taste pretty good, esp. with a dark roast like Starbucks Sumatra or Trader Joe's Expresso.

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  • 5 years later...
On 4/11/2014 at 9:01 AM, turtle said:

I am a "coffee-holic"

I live coffee.

At home I roast single origin green beans in a small 1/2 pound batch roaster and roast 2-3 pounds at a time (4 to 6 batches) per week.

Now I can't take my roaster and all of my "coffee paraphernalia" with me on the road.

SO.....

I start out with a couple pounds of "my roast" then when I start to run low I google for artisan roasters in towns I will be passing through to grab a pound of fresh roasted to keep me going. I try to not let fresh roasted coffee set as roasted beans for more than 14 days as they start to stale after two weeks so I only take what we can drink in 2 weeks then when I am down to about 1/2 lb I start looking online for an artisan roaster that I will pass by and see what they have available.

That is how I "handle" my roasted, unground beans.

Brewing on the road......

I use an 8 cup (this is 4 "American size" 10oz cups) Chemex brewer.

I grind my beans in a Kyocera CM-50 which has the Orphan Espresso PFP modification (extra bearing in the grinder for press and pour over grinds). And I use a coffee percolator.

I grind just before brewing as coffee is only good for about 15 minutes after grinding before it starts to "stale" (told you I was a coffee-holic)

I use a small Revereware tea kettle to boil the water. First kettle of water goes in the Chemex to rinse the paper filter then into the carafe to warm it, second kettle of water brews the coffee, and a third kettle (of tank water) goes on to make hot water to wash dishes with.

Once the coffee is made I put two cups of the brewed coffee into our cups and the other two cups into a heated thermal carafe.

Sometimes I will make another pot to put in our thermos so we can have 2 more cups each (did I say I was a coffee-holic?)

Pics of Kyocera CM-50 (Kyocera on the right, the hand mill on the left is a Hario mini espresso grinder)

http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u414/turtle-web/food/coffee/grinders/hand/kyo_mini_zps6a55c17d.jpg

8 cup Chemex is the one in the middle (I only travel with 1 brewer and I like the silky smooth, coffee that a Chemex makes)

http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u414/turtle-web/food/coffee/pour_over/chemex/3_amegos_zps67d4e97e.jpg

Oh I might as well add my home stuff to this post as I have already let it get out of hand

I roast outside because of all the smoke roasting beans make

http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u414/turtle-web/food/coffee/Hottop/hottop_outside_2-10-2014_zpsed99e528.jpg

Grinder line up

http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u414/turtle-web/food/coffee/grinders/3-17-2014_grinders_zps3b26b14c.jpg

"Electric" brewers

http://i1066.photobucket.com/albums/u414/turtle-web/food/coffee/Machines/PasBunn_2-26-2014_zpse51acc9d.jpg

It looks so cool! I I also use Kyocera CM-50 and I can recommend it for sure.

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I pre-grind my beans and put them in a zip lock in the freezer. I've never noticed any loss of flavor. Last thing I need when camping is lots of appliances to clean every morning. I'm here to relax. I brew my coffee in a stove top espresso machine. Heaven

Linda S

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Starbucks breakfast blend, Mr.Coffee 5 cup maker, no paper filter, I get only two cups out of it. First cup is to GO and second with breakfast. It works every time. :-)

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Well I can't comment on the "RV-ing specific" setup, but I have traveled back and forth across the country multiple times by car, and in my slightly younger days, did plenty of backpacking and bike camping.

 

I would agree with mustmrk and Linda that a french press takes an almost annoying amount of water to clean.  Still, it is probably my favorite method to brew coffee though.  Especially when camping or traveling.  I have a Snow Peak Titanium french press that I have had well over 20yrs.  I can't tell you how many Bodum presses have exploded on me over the years, I would not travel with one.  My Snow Peak only has one drawback, it makes a single cuppa.  But it can also be used to heat the water.  

 

My second favorite coffee brewing method is the Areopress.  Absolutely brilliant coffee!  Still just one cup though.  But much easier to clean.  Basically, it self cleans when you pop the puck.

 

Whenever I go camping with the wife or others, I use Melita cone brewers.  If you are a coffee snob, this is not an ideal brew method.  There is little control over the taste.  This is fine for a cup of Folgers, or whatever your favorite brand of store/shelf coffee is.  Easy to clean up.  This is my go to lazy, or in a hurry method.  It is also light and small enough that there is no reason I wouldn't take these in the RV.  But I am still taking at least one of the other two, especially if I am taking nice coffee.

 

I have camped, traveled, and daily lived with a Hario Mini Slim grinder.  It is the PERFECT grinder to solo travel or pack with.  A little too small for more than single use though.  The Kyocera and the Hario Skerton look to be identical.  Even if just using store/shelf coffee, upgrading to beans and fresh grinding them does make a NOTICEABLE difference.  I am going to be grabbing a Skerton sometime soon.  

 

When traveling and camping, the coffee ritual is probably the most important and enjoyable part of the day for me.  I am more relaxed and not grabbing a thermos and running out the door.  So the extra effort for me is more than worth it.  I am not in a hurry and can truly sit and enjoy it.  

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