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What tire pressure for a 1990 19ft Winnebago Warior with dualies


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When I bought my rig in 2017 the tires looked nearly new and had (as I remember - and my remembering isn't great)  50 psi in all 6 tires.  Then I checked the date code and the tires were 20 years old, so I promptly bought all new tires at "America's Tire" and they set them to 60 psi for the front tires (or was it the rear?) and 50 psi for the 4 rear tires (or is that backwards - doesn't matter).  

Then I had it in the shop and they set all 6 tires to 32 psi and told me that the data sheet in the door frame said to use 28 psi. But the tires have a max pressure of 65 psi.   Now, I had seen the 28 psi and noticed the old tires had a max of 65 psi when I bought the rig - but I figured the 28 psi was for the Toyota pickup without the cabin.  It seemed weird to have the pressure set at less than half the rated max, so ~50 psi seemed reasonable. 

Also at 32 psi the tires LOOK low,  they bulge way out and the dualies must be touching in between. 

Finally the manual (yes I have the original) says "Obtain proper inflation pressures from your vehicle chassis manufacturer OR tire manufacturer."

 

Any of you wise folks have a better idea of the best pressure for:  handling first, mileage second, and tire life third??

 

Thanks in advance,

Worrier

 

 

Edited by RoadWorrier
typos and clarity (and OCD)
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 It depends on your tire. Check the sidewall. Then what type of tires do you have? If you are running C or D rated tires and the shop put them at 32, go back and smack them upside the head. 

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Everyone seems to have an opinion on tire pressure.   There is a company been making tires for over 100 years,  has billions of miles of tire experience.  Bus loads of tire engineers and truck loads of computers.  They also have access to data from university's, governments and car manufactures.  They made a video on how to weight and determine correct pressure for tires and are financially liable if the info is wrong.  

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wb7W-nRAPrk&t=21s

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Didnt watch the video yet but you also have to consider what happens if you have a rear blowout.  The remaining tire needs to be able to handle the extra weight 

Linda S

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7 hours ago, linda s said:

Didnt watch the video yet but you also have to consider what happens if you have a rear blowout.  The remaining tire needs to be able to handle the extra weight 

Linda S

Internet myth .   My rear axle scale weight is 4820 lbs,  approximately 2400 lbs per side.     A load range D tire inflated to 65 psi is rated at 1764 lbs dual and 1874 lbs single.  No where near 2400 lbs, a 30% overload.   Derick and I use to PM about this.  

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4 minutes ago, jjrbus said:

Internet myth .   My rear axle scale weight is 4820 lbs,  approximately 2400 lbs per side.     A load range D tire inflated to 65 psi is rated at 1764 lbs dual and 1874 lbs single.  No where near 2400 lbs, a 30% overload.   Derick and I use to PM about this.  

 

 The argument isn't that you can just forget it and run your unit that way. The argument is that you can carefully get yourself to somewhere to get it taken care of. You can run car tires on a camper. Mine had passenger car tires on it when I got it. Obviously they worked for the previous person but I'm not going to do it. An overloaded tire will take the extra load (in general) for awhile. So telling someone if one rear tire goes flat you can limp yourself to a repair place isn't a myth.

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Yes, just a single in the back will be considerably overloaded in the event of a blow out. However, a single can hold you in the event of a blow out for a period of time. I know because I have been there and had an explosive blowout of one of my dual tires resulting in damage while on the interstate. Yet the other remained inflated and got me to an off ramp and into town where I was able to have my situation resolved. Rating does not reflect absolute reality. Of course, I am not recommending you ride with a single tire on back. Nor am I suggesting everyone's experience will be like mine. 

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Riding on over inflated tires, referred to as riding on bowling balls can cause longer stopping distances, hydroplaning and tire damage as the tire cannot flex when hitting anything on road.  Also can mask that one tire is flat or low on air, then you can continue on until the other tire blows! 

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Were not talking about overinflated. Just fully inflated. Just looked at the chart Derek posted from Hankook. D load range tires inflated to only 32lbs cant even handle the weight of your rig when all 4 rear are good. They top out at 4600 lbs. 

Linda S

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12 minutes ago, linda s said:

Were not talking about overinflated. Just fully inflated. Just looked at the chart Derek posted from Hankook. D load range tires inflated to only 32lbs cant even handle the weight of your rig when all 4 rear are good. They top out at 4600 lbs. 

Linda S

Over inflated is over the psi recommended in the load and inflation table for the weight.  Now I see why I stopped posting about tire pressure!   

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4 minutes ago, jjrbus said:

Over inflated is over the psi recommended in the load and inflation table for the weight.  Now I see why I stopped posting about tire pressure!   

 

 Which will never be 32psi.

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WOW!!  Thank you ALL so much.  Knowledge, experience, AND a good back and forth between thoughtful folks.

 

And SPECIAL thanks to  jjrbus for the video.  I learned a huge amount.

 

I have not yet WEIGHED my rig (each time I've been at the truck stop the line's been too long.)  So I only know what Winnebago says it weighs.  So I'll go for that with another 500 lbs. until I can get back on the road for real (with a full load of cargo ) and wait in line.

 

Thanks again!! ~A Stone (Sanazay CA)

Moe2-DriverSide.JPG

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1 hour ago, RoadWorrier said:

WOW!!  Thank you ALL so much.  Knowledge, experience, AND a good back and forth between thoughtful folks.

 

And SPECIAL thanks to  jjrbus for the video.  I learned a huge amount.

 

I have not yet WEIGHED my rig (each time I've been at the truck stop the line's been too long.)  So I only know what Winnebago says it weighs.  So I'll go for that with another 500 lbs. until I can get back on the road for real (with a full load of cargo ) and wait in line.

 

Thanks again!! ~A Stone (Sanazay CA)

Moe2-DriverSide.JPG

Many scrap yards and metal recyclers have drive on scales. Might not meet DOT approval but good for getting basic weight. Doesn’t hurt to ask. 🙂

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Thanks Fred.  I'll check that out - there are some a lot closer than the truck stop.  ~AS

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I stay away from scrap yards,  too much small scrap waiting for a tire to puncture.    Used to be when the highway truck scales were closed the scales were left on.  The new computer ones in Florida are off when the stations are closed. 

 

 I read what is posted on the forums and then do what Michelin posts!  They also have a good blowout video.. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkwOE1yKY5c&t=40s

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Our local county transfer station weighed us for free. The scale is pretty far away from the waste, so no tire issues. Might be worth looking into in your area.

Edited by mustrmrk
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