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Up to 110,000 miles now so want to adjust my valves on a 3VZE V-6.  What is a fair price for a reliable shop to do the work?

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It's a complicated and time consuming job. Measurements need to be taken and shims ordered to complete job. Only way to tell how much it will cost is to start calling. Location makes quite a difference too. It can be pretty expensive . Brace yourself

Linda S

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this is one where the dealer makes sense. they will have a large selection of the shims to do the adjustment on hand, where others have to take it apart, order shims, then finish the job.

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Thanks for your replies, Linda, jjrbus, and extech.  I knew it would be pricey, just trying not to be taken advantage of.

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Posted (edited)

The 3VZE is an OLD engine, check that your mech has experience and shims before starting. Even factory Toy dealers don't keep a bunch of shims in stock for a 25 year old engine.

Edited by WME
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Shims are available but it's not a job for the faint of heart and you will need the tool to press the shim bucket down and a micrometer air gun helps too the blow the shim out of the bucket and last but not least a pencil to write the shim size down on the cylinder hear. It is a time consumer so be prepared for sticker shock. You could pull the cam covers and check them but that is not a lot of fun either. Here is the theory behind shimmed valves the ideal is every thing wares at the same rate so the adjustment "should" outlast the engine. If you are in doubt you could do a compression check if you have a cylinder with noticeable difference it could be a tight valve other wise I would leave it alone. They still use the same ideal today My 2011 Tacoma 4L is basically the same setup just twice the number of valves. I have seen those engines with well over 250K that have never been touched. The variants were made up until 1996.

 

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Unfortunately the 3.0's were known to have burnt valve problems complicated by the heat from the crossover exhaust pipe. Some changes were made to the engine to try to fix the problem but not until 1993. That leaves out most of the RV's. Toyota recommended the valve adjustment every 60,000 miles. Probably better to be safe if you want to use your RV a long time. I do think the constant weight of the RV makes the heat issue worse

Linda S

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Yes and the early ones were known to gum up with oil sludge. More than likely poor maintenance. With the mileage the OP has  I believe it was well taken care of. if it were mine I would do a quick compression check and go from there if a valve has too little clearance it will show up with lower compression. 

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I understand the owner's concern considering the prices these things are selling for these days. Wanting piece of mind the motor will remain operational as long as possible. I check the valves every 15k or so on my 22re because its easy and because of the strain I put on the motor due to the weight. 

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Good plan part of a normal tune up but it is not an engine with shimmed valves. 

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13 hours ago, Maineah said:

Yes and the early ones were known to gum up with oil sludge. More than likely poor maintenance. With the mileage the OP has  I believe it was well taken care of. if it were mine I would do a quick compression check and go from there if a valve has too little clearance it will show up with lower compression. 

I an going to elaborate here on compression check of a shimmed valve engine. The clearance is part of the valve timing, if the valve clearance is too tight the valve will open too early. Too great a clearance it will open too late (much less likely). This has an effect on the compression of an engine and it's over all efficiency. A valve adjustment on the V6 is time consuming and expensive this is why I suggest a compression check it will tell you a story. The concept is nothing new shimmed valve engines have been around for decades Jag had them in the late 40's they were even more fun because you had to take the cams out because the shim was under the bucket and about the diameter of a dime they never had any issues with tight valves but any head worked required an adjustment. I had dirty finger nails for 38 years before I finally got a clean job been there done that. 

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Yea, have done it in the motorcycle world but not cars. My current cycle has shim/bucket style valve adjustments but only 2 valves per cylinder on a 4 cylinder vehicle. I did it 18k ago and checks are recommended at 10k intervals; I'm avoiding it because it's not my favorite job and the bike is having no symptoms of tight valves. Owner didn't mention whether he/she was having symptoms requiring a valve adjustment check such as a hard start. A list of symptoms leading to a valve check recommendation would be helpful. My cycle was getting so hard to start I got in there to measure in addition to my other checks, and did have to replace some shims on both sides. Tight. 

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is it possable to adjust the 22rec cold instead of hot . the only problem i have on those a misery too do blasing hot . was wondering if it could be done cold by increasing the clearence settings .from .o8 intake and .012 ext.

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what would use for the setings i have 2 22rec xtra cab  and mh. can you give the settings please.

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for shure loose is better than tight. a little ticking is fine . i thought maybe i should incress the clerance a little . was not shure thank you .

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FWIW - from 22reperformance.com:

 

Check the valve adjustment and keep an eye out for any that are too tight. We recommend checking valve adjustment every 7.5k to 10k miles. I know the manual says to adjust them with the engine “hot”, but we’ve found the adjustment procedure to give more consistent results and turn out more accurate when done COLD. Cold means that you can’t feel any heat when you lay your hand on the engine. We also recommend going a hair tighter than the factory says too. .007” on the intake and .011” on the exhaust side. If it’s your first time adjusting valves, TAKE YOUR TIME AND TRIPLE CHECK YOUR WORK. 

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As the engine warms the clearance diminishes if any thing a .001 loose is better overall. How warm  or cold is the engine in reality? People have a tendency to adjust valves a shade tight with a bit more drag on the feeler gauge than necessary any way, you shouldn't have to yank it out. Toyota says 60K miles, normal operating temp at .008 intake and .012 exhaust I kind of think they know their engines. My 4L Tacoma is a shim valve engine it's not particularly quiet often referred to as the Taco "tick".  I would rather hear a little tick than a quiet tight valve. These are not performance engines but they are good ones.

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