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Fuel pump


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On 10/7/2018 at 4:19 PM, Derek up North said:

Only if you cut an access hatch in the floor. Not too shabby an idea though.

 

Baitwell hatch boat covers work nice for that.

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Drain the tank and crawl under ready for a good time, it's really not TOO bad.  Or you know, cut a hole in your floor!  

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6 hours ago, Odyssey 4x4 said:

Drain the tank and crawl under ready for a good time, it's really not TOO bad.  Or you know, cut a hole in your floor!  

good time to replace filler neck hose if you drop the tank mine was shot gas fumes in camper .

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  • 2 months later...

I replaced the fuel pump on my 1988 Itasca from the inside. It was a very easy thing for me to accomplish as I have a very high skill set and lug around a huge amount of tools.

Calculating the position of the position of the pump was a trial and error thing. 

I used a skill saw to take up the floor and used plastic wood and screws to put the floor back together.  I will post the pictures of my project later.  If you need to get to towed doing to a failed fuel pump far from home have them tow you to the nearest Napa, Home Depot, Walmart, or any National auto parts store,

The position of the pump in my 1988  was very easy to access  I got a new pump from Napa.  ( I stealth camp at Napa Frequently) . 

Other than a saw of some sort and a drill to drive screws replacing the fuel pump from the top is something that anyone who reads this forum can accomplish while traveling and not break the bank.

Your fuel pump will eventually pass on.

Most likely after filling your empty tank with fuel that comes from an underground tank (55 degrees) and your pump is heated up from not having the cooling effects of the fuel for the last quarter of the tank. The pump fails. You may be able to move on by banging  the fuel tank with a hammer and have the pump get you to a safe space.

If your pump has failed my best advice would be to get your rig towed to Home Depot (every tool needed is there) and call Napa to deliver you a new pump...

If you take care and put the tools back in the packaging then they can be returned.....

I have full coverage thru State Farm and If I pay up front my Agent writes me checks for the full amount of towing expenses.

 

 

 

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Small boat hatches work well if you replace the pump from inside as a cover. Here is the deal on the pumps more than anything else being an RV it does not get used much use so they have a tendency to gum up and a body that is at rest tends to stay at rest I have never lost a pump on a Toyota pickup two had just shy of 300K. The pump is cooled by the fuel so as long as there is enough gas in the tank to keep the thing running it is being cooled right to the bitter end the system also returns close to 50% of the fuel it pumps to the tank. The fuel flows right through the pump and the motor on it's way to the engine. Maybe it's just me but somehow I think HD might get a little testy lending some one tools to fix their MH in the parking lot. I can't get napa to deliver to my house and I have an account!

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  • 2 weeks later...

the hardest thing on in tank pumps is running them super low or even worse out of gas . made to be cooled by the gas .

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Here is a diagram of a intank pump the fuel flows right through the pump, motor, past the brushes and out the discharge this is what keeps them cool. There is not enough air in a fuel tank to support combustion so there is zero chance of fire. Case in point Chevy had issues of burnt pump connections inside the tank. The pumps are capable of over 80 psi twice the flow of what the engine uses the excess is returned to the tank and re-pumped until the excess is used then everything comes to a halt from lack of fuel pressure one shot of air it's going to stop running. I don't recommend running the fuel low mainly because it's inconvenient to carry a gas can back to the vehicle and most people learn pretty quick that it's not a lot of fun to run out of gas but is long as the vehicle is moving there is still a lot of gas to keep the pump cool.Image result for electric fuel pump flow diagram

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1 hour ago, Derek up North said:

I agree that it's the flow of fuel through the pump that keeps it cool. There are plenty of vehicles where the pump is installed externally (to the tank) that are obviously not cooled by being surrounded by fuel.

Old school carb external fuel pumps not fuel cooled, EFI inline external fuel pumps, cooled by fuel flow internally.

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2 hours ago, WME said:

Old school carb external fuel pumps not fuel cooled, EFI inline external fuel pumps, cooled by fuel flow internally.

True and they were only around 3 psi! The FI pumps zing right along all FI pumps are cooled by fuel flow through the pump itself ambient air fuel temp is a lot lower than a working pump motor.

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