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thewanderlustking

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About thewanderlustking

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    1986 Mini Cruiser

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  1. Ironically right after I wrote that in my other thread, the woman calls me into the other room and declares that she "needs" a vehicle with a snorkel. Now after seeing her white knuckled as I drove through yesterdays disaster zone left by Hurricane Ian, I translated this into she wanted me to have said vehicle. So I told her that 4x4 Sunraders all have snorkels -=cough=- and was told I could get one. Lets see how that holds up in the morning hahahaha! Timing was perfect though and I went off on a tangent in that thread before I edited it all out. Bound For Nowhere's horrible experience with theirs though makes me ask, how truly capable is the Sunrader 4x4? I mean it is based on one of the most legendary 4x4 platforms out there, so what went wrong with theirs? I really want to rewatch that whole series with this in mind. I think I could even put it up on the bigscreen and get her to sit down and enjoy it. But yeah that is bit difficult right now. My internet is down for who knows how long, and tethering to my phone is pretty slow. I don't expect this to be a crawler, but not being afraid to take it down a forest road, or drive it through flooded out roads would be awesome. I came into this whole ToyHome ownership thinking I wanted a Dolphin. I had fallen for them after working on one of the older foolie versions years ago. I looked and looked but never found one at an affordable price, or close enough to get to it. My Mini Cruiser came up and met the affordable and nearby criteria, and I really liked the layout. (Although now I realize how much better most of the Dolphin layouts are...) Anyways, as I have leaned more about Toyota trucks and also the ToyHomes, I have been drawn to the Sunrader. So much easier to get structurally sound... I LOVE my Mini Cruiser, but I would seriously contemplate letting it go if it got me close enough to make the stretch to a Sunrader. Sadly, I am pretty sure that won't ever happen... Perhaps a 2wd one, but the 4wd ones are stupid prices. These seem hard to find cheaply in either configuration. The conversion from 2wd to 4wd I could do. But I would want one with a nice interior cause that would stretch the budget thin... Anyways while this is a dreaming of kicking the tires thread... getting an 80's/90's era 4x4 Toyota of some sort is in the cards. I could even afford one now if I sold the Porsche.
  2. (Disclaimer Linda, I stuck this here as the subforum it probably should be in doesn't seem to get any traffic, but if you decide to move it I won't be offended. This new forum setup might eliminate that issue anyways, I don't know. Anyways...) So I have been having an adventure of things here. Hurricane Ian just went through and DEVASTATED a huge swath of Florida. I wasn't in the eye, but it was still sustained cat 3-4 conditions here approaching 5 with winds hitting 155mph. It is one of the biggest hurricanes ever recorded. Here in Sarasota, we were WELL prepared. I think we all remembered Irma just a little too well. And Irma probably already had taken down all the weakest trees. We were ready. But further South, they only had maybe 12-18 hours of warning when the eye shifted lower. Just 20 miles from me, it is an ABSOLUTE war zone. What is normally a 40 minute trip, took almost 3hrs each way. I75 is now closed down. Conflicting reports of just flooded vs an overpass was taken out. The flooding is so deep I am not sure anyone can tell without scuba gear! It was an adventure for sure. And I came to two conclusions. 1) I want, perhaps even "need" a shorty 18' 4x4 Sunrader. I greatly enjoy camping in out of the way spots, so an overlander type setup, but OG Sunrader style, would be awesome. Wow that takes me down a whole tangent for another thread... Lets move on. I should post that on its own... 2) I need mobile internet. I have a ToughBook problem. All my laptops (except my MacBook) actually have built in WWAN cards (cellular modems). I went off to ask questions over on my favorite ToughBook forum, ToughBookTalk. But then I realized that this is probably an even better resource to utilize! What do you guys use out on the road for internet? Tethering to my phone is cheap and easy. It works well enough. But if I spend more than 30 seconds writing a post, the connection goes dead and I have to reinitialize it. It is super annoying. I have the built in modems, but those do take an extra data plan and I am unsure yet if I can use just one sim and swap to whatever laptop (physically easy to do), or if I lock the sim to the particular modem. I figure most RVers aren't using military laptops with night vision capable monitors and cellular uplinks. And especially our extra frugal and more analog ToyHomers. I am super curious as to what you guys do??? Tethering was not working well yesterday when it actually was a SHTF situation. I needed real-time road condition updates. By the time we made it in and were ready to head back, road conditions had changed DRASTICALLY. Randomly, carplay on her Subaru also stopped working with my phone. Still, this doesn't completely shut down the just "using my phone" option. But I know that stressful situations can easily occur under normal driving conditions where trying to use the phone for simple GPS navigation can cause disaster. The fewer layers of technology that are involved, usually means the more reliable. I need to take a look at the current options for Garmin units out there, but at best that would only solve part of it and not give me an internet connection.
  3. Well Linda you are darn lucky to have two, and they are equally lucky to be yours! But seriously, awesome save! Out of curiosity does it have the evil bad axle?! Not starting the whole OMG its unsafe ordeal, just wondering lol.
  4. And so it starts… In 5 more years you will be just like Linda and have a whole fleet of them! Sounds like a really good plan! Keep at it lol! 🤣
  5. Well Ian was pretty destructive and very catastrophic to many, just fortunately not us. Standing on my roof and every house around me suffered either damages, or massive trees down, or both. For once it is nice to see that my over obsessive preparations actually were worth while. My neighbors are probably convinced now that I’m crazy as I was excited the RV didn’t leak! I will probably use the stove in it tonight to make dinner too! I have been thinking about that problem…. There is some flex to the exterior braces. If I can keep the ends pulled down while pushing up in the middle, I could make the interior support beams from 2-3 pieces of oak each and laminate them. My interior is such where I could do this all in place. But…. Doing it out of there on a jig would give me way more control and I could get it even. And again I don’t need a lot. Half an inch to maybe an inch. I need to under engineer my over engineering bran and work on the idea until I come up with an effective solution for this particular use case lol. Less work always wins, especially if I can make it effective. The only hard part of this idea is to figure out the geometry of it and how to make a jig simply enough.
  6. Well Ian was pretty destructive and very catastrophic to many, just fortunately not us. Standing on my roof and every house around me suffered either damages, or massive trees down, or both. For once it is nice to see that my over obsessive preparations actually were worth while. My neighbors are probably convinced now that I’m crazy as I was excited the RV didn’t leak! I will probably use the stove in it tonight to make dinner too! I have been thinking about that problem…. There is some flex to the exterior braces. If I can keep the ends pulled down while pushing up in the middle, I could make the interior support beams from 2-3 pieces of oak each and laminate them. My interior is such where I could do this all in place. But…. Doing it out of there on a jig would give me way more control and I could get it even. And again I don’t need a lot. Half an inch to maybe an inch. I need to under engineer my over engineering bran and work on the idea until I come up with an effective solution for this particular use case lol. Less work always wins, especially if I can make it effective. The only hard part of this idea is to figure out the geometry of it and how to make a jig simply enough.
  7. Well it survived a cat 5 hurricane with almost no leaks! It leaked through the makeshift plywood patch, but I knew it was going to as even in a more mild rain it was dripping. So I put the ac cover pan underneath it. Was a great place to store it out of the hurricane anyways. There was another small leak either in the back where I didn’t reseal, or right on the border where I stopped, I can’t tell exactly where yet. The rest is bone dry! I call that a win! Our main house did fine, our second house for Mom sustained unknown damages, but we can’t get there yet to see how bad it is. The in-laws lost their house completely. But they fortunately were up north. Anyways, this isn’t a pity party but FINALLY some good news that the roof is sealed up! That Henry 887 stuff worked AWESOME! The generator we got a couple years back for hurricanes/power outages is STUPID QUIET. I will check it with a decible meter later, but I think it could be run in a campground without being too disruptive. It is also light. Rethinking utilizing it for the RV. And it could have been way worse. It was a scary storm!
  8. That dual stage thermostat looks like a really good idea! I will defiantly set up some temp monitor alarms too….
  9. Take a good look around and trace your wiring from the battery and especially the grounds. I had one loose ground and half my house systems were offline. I don’t know about other vintage setups, but on my system the converter is just hooked up to the 12v power and ground. IE just dumping the 12v into it. So if the inverter is broken, as long as 12v power and ground to the house battery is solid, everything is still online.
  10. Hello and welcome! It does, but like all forum searches it could be better. You can also Google whatever you need to know and if it is Toyota RV related and it is on here, this site quickly comes up in the search It is pretty highly ranked for that. If I am looking for an old thread on here, it frequently is easier to find it via Google (unless I know the name of the thread). Also feel free to ask whatever you are curious about on here, and you should pretty quickly either get an answer, or guidance as to where or what to ask or look for. Oh, and people are very friendly here. The site is well traveled by a nice handful of regulars. Questions rarely go unanswered for long. And while most of the questions that get asked regularly are probably easy to find, you will probably never get the "Did you actually try search?" snarky responses. Toyota RV ownership is different and a little special. These guys defiantly have some quirks to them. And a really awesome support group here!
  11. Actually Linda, I will take you up on that offer if not too much trouble! I sent you a PM. Thank you! Okay a little more digging and looking for solutions. There is a pretty high chance my roof has an EPDM membrane on it. And some other unknowns too... I pulled this from the MFM information linked above: So while perhaps not 100% necessary, I am going to go with it is probably a really good idea to primer before laying down. The Peel and Seal stuff is just expensive enough that I want to guarantee I only do this ONCE. Maybe I am being overcautious? But as we know my roof is a MESS and I won't get it cleaned off enough to be laying on bare aluminum. Plus that would take way more time than the cost of primer. And that primer also seems to be what is needed for most of the liquid coverings too. Having trouble finding a price for the Mule Hide Tape Primer MFM recommends, but some similar products seem to be about $30. The I have a distributer for the Mule Hide right around the corner I can contact during normal work hours lol. Searching EPDM Primer though brings up some more interesting stuff like: EPDM Rinse Cleaner Starting to get a little more spendy, but it also perfectly describes the mess up there that I am dealing with... Still doing cleanup though outside and inside. Anyways trying out a couple actual pieces of the MFM material up on the mess will give me a much better idea if I really need primer. And for that matter if the Peel and Seal will even work at all.
  12. Holy crap Gary I want that one! First off is this an exhaust, or a raw gas smell? Lets assume you have a raw gas smell and not an exhaust one. Raw gas is way more serious of a short term issue as a fuel leak can easily cause a fire. Get a fire extinguisher first. Then run it a few minutes and shut it off. No reason to get it hot or run it long at all. You just want to essentially pressurize the system and have fuel running through it. Jack it up by the frame on the passenger side. Put a jack stand under it, be safe! Go investigate. Oh, do this when everything underneath is dry, it can be rainy, but you don't want to have driven the vehicle and gotten it all wet. Look really carefully around the engine bay. Many more places here where a fuel leak is likely. You are looking for wetness, if you see any, touch, sniff, verify it is gas. If it is a small leak and the engine is hot, it can actually evaporate before you even see the leak. You seem to think it is the fuel tank though. There is one gasket up on top, but it is unlikely to be a leaker unless the tank is completely full. The hoses up there are way more likely to be a problem. I don't know if your tank is metal or plastic? Lets assume it is metal... Either one can usually be repaired if it is a cracked/damaged tank. That is a whole 'other story though, and only worth doing if you do have the unobtanium 26 gallon tank. Most of the methods I would suggest should be left to the professionals here too lol. There are some quick and easy ways to do repairs, if the spot is accessible, with the tank still in place. If not and you don't want to pay a shop to pull the tank, empty it isn't too hard to remove. A metal tank can then be taken to a place that cleans them, boiled out, and resealed if needed. This is DIY-able too, but it is a bit of stinky work with crappy chemicals. The POR-15 kit to do it is $100 + tax and shipping. The last time I had a tank cleaned and resealed, it was something like $250. Only slightly more than if one could just replace the tank at "normal" prices. Having resealed tanks myself in the past, it is WELL WORTH having this done by professional shop instead. Especially if the tank needs a patch welded/brazed in. In the shop, I have a handful of various borescopes. If I were to see a leak coming from on top of your gas tank, I would grab a borescope and figure out where. (You can grab one on Amazon for $30-50 that connects to your phone or a laptop.) If it is in the middle on top where the sender is, it is most likely going to be one of the short rubber fuel lines. Now a shop is going to probably pull the tank either way. But in your driveway you might have another option... I spent a couple hours measuring, remeasuring, verifying, remeasuring and then drilled a small pilot hole in my floor. I dropped a screwdriver down and verified where that hole was, right above my sender. Then I used a 6" holes and popped a hole through the floor. (I think it was 6", it was silly expensive). In my case this was underneath my dining table. My hole was ever so slightly off by an inch or so from perfectly centered above the tank access, but is was good enough. I cleaned off the degree sitting there, undid my file lines, and opened the tank up to replace the fuel pump. To fill the hole back in, one of the guys on here suggested a deck hatch spin in cover. I had to slightly enlarge the hole with a router, but it has been a perfect solution and I can access those lines, and replace a fuel pump easily on the side of the road or in a parking lot now. While this is a "slightly ghetto" DIY repair, I wouldn't change my mind and do it differently now. I would have maybe measured it a few more times though LOL! BTW, if it is a rusted out steel line above the tank, you still need to access the end attached to the tank. You probably could do this the same way. Removing the old line could be tricky as Toyota ran it on top of the frame rail. But you could run a new line and attach it to the tank and leave the old one in place if you can't tug it out from underneath. I am pretty sure I remember seeing my feed line having a rubber line repair splice in it between the tank and the run up front. Steel line is cheaper than the correct high pressure rubber line, so a long run of rubber line would make less sense.
  13. Good mention of the valve adjustment! I hadn't even thought of that one. And ironically, I had purchased two packs of the feeler gauge handles just for doing that at some point in the future. My valve cover looks, drab. And the nut gaskets on top are a bit dry rotted. Somehow it isn't leaking, but yanking it to clean it off, polish it, and replace the 22re sticker that is supposed to be on the front of it is in the sometime future plans to do. I probably got those with the thought to adjust the valves then too. Timing is SUPER CRITICAL! WME covers this with the "bad detonation" above... But it needs to be specifically touched on. These engines can run a CRAZY amount out of timing spec and seem like there is nothing wrong. Power might feel a little down, but since they always feel low on power, it is hard to quantify that. My timing was something like 40 degrees out, and it still ran and sounded fine until you went down the road. Even unloaded, our beasts are heavy enough for this to cause some serious detonation issues. Add old and likely low octane fuel to the mix and POP goes the head gasket! I may buy an "insurance policy" and pick up a full gasket set, timing chain, water pump... I can quickly make a little wood crate/box to store the gasket set in. This is something I have done in the past for my other travels. And while I have never had to do a head gasket on the side of the road, I have had to use other gaskets from the set before. The box is easy. A simple frame large and just deep enough to fit the gasket set in, with 1/8th luan ply screwed to both sides. I leave it in the shrink wrap, and usually add another layer of saran wrap or press and seal to it. I do not put the heavy items like the timing chain kit into this. While a slight overkill, it keeps the set safe. In a car there is a lot less room to hide this somewhere. Anyplace you put it is likely to get bumped around at some point. Overkill and completely pointless to do if one doesn't have the ability to utilize it. No shop would want to use this set lol. But I had one gasket set stored like this in my trunk for 5-6yrs before I tore into it and put a head onto my old VW Rabbit. That was a few years back and it is still running strong for the new owner.
  14. Just over the past year I think there have been at least 3-4 posters coming on here with blown or leaking head gaskets. A couple of those were trying to limp their damaged vehicle back to home base. I know over the years it has been a common theme for these RV's. And these handful don't account for all the other onlookers who stop in for information, but don't post or register. (A word to you guys, register here, it is well worth it!!!) Today, I see another "Check your head gaskets" mentioned in a thread and it gets me to thinking. I have joked that I would be perfectly fine with changing my 22re head gasket out in an Autozone or Walmart parking lot, and I defiantly am. But it is even easier sitting in my driveway and doing it BEFORE it has become an actual problem. But at what point is this a prudent or recommended thing to do? In my case the beast only has 32k on it. Mine looks like the engine had been super well maintained and even has the bright red Toyota coolant in it. No engine oil leaks. Mobile 1 synthetic, yada yada. But it is now 37yrs old. For me it is easy to do a seasonal block test, so I could probably catch it as it starts to leak. But again, it is 37yrs old and I don't know if that makes it more likely to have a sudden catastrophic failure, or if it really makes no difference. Three is one factor that really tempts me into doing this as a preventive thing. If I do this before there is a leak and overheat failure, it makes clean up of the surfaces a simpler carbide scraper and roloc disc cleanup. I just need clean surfaces and no worries about having the head machined and shims ordered. But is this even realistically necessary? There are other preventive maintenance steps that can be done to prevent overheating to begin with. Changing the thermostat, fresh coolant, pressure testing the coolant system, and adding a bottle of Redline Waterwetter to the mix. (In my situation, I can even datalog temps and have an audio/visual alarm that goes off if my temps even START to creep out of the normal zone. Including transmission temp.) Obviously, this pre-preventive maintenance is something most of us can and should do. But is there a point where we should seriously consider adding the headgaket(s) to this list too as a simpler preventative job before it becomes a necessary one? It is perhaps an odd question for a mechanic to ask, but I deal with more modern cars most of the time. I really see a car more than 20yrs old. This truck is the oldest unmolested car I have ever owned. While I have had even older cars, they all had performance rebuilt engines and fresh components. Google essentially says: And for the most part I agree. I also have a 1985 Porsche with 60k on it. And zero thought or concern about changing its likely original head gasket. But it will probably never be driven further than a free tow away from home.
  15. SWEET! That is perfect! It adds back in a little structure, is essentially the same as the Eternabond, and it is much wider! In the reviews for that, probably 3/4 or better were actually using it on RV roofs, and I saw one that looked like a Dolphin to Mini Cruiser. I did some digging around and reading the fine print, that does need/reccomend the primer in a few installation scenarios (like over EPDM). And they seemed to overlap with the eternabond recommendations. Fortunately the materials for cleaning and priming seem to be readily available at the local hardware store. I get the feeling that this and the Eternabond products are essentially the exact same, except for marketing and the "specialist" nature of the eternabond. So I do need to try and figure out what is on my roof now. And it is pretty funky, so I also need to do some sort of cleanup. I shouldn't need that sample though thank you Linda. Something like 9 rolls of the MFM are on the shelf at Lowes.
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