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OK all I am going to make this a sticky. There is a ton of things we can possibly do to the 22 and V6 engines and drive trains for MPG and HP/Torque gains. There are big differences between the 22 and V6 transmissions, 22 no locking torque converter (except 22re turbo) and V6 has a locking torque converter.

Here is a list.
Air filters
Cold air intake systems
Spark plugs
Higher voltage coils
Larger exhaust including catalytic converters
Camshafts
Engine oil and additives
Transmission coolers
Larger radiators
Tire sizes
Rear end gear ratio changes
Actual MPG numbers. We are not all in Kansas where it is flat forever! Don't forget weight, coach length and cargo.
Sure I missed something.

Have at it, all opinions and scientific facts need apply.

Oh, forgot one thing, drafting behind an 18 wheeler, it does work!

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17 hours ago, Gulfstream Greg said:

Oh, forgot one thing, drafting behind an 18 wheeler, it does work

The only problem with that is your depending on the driver in front. I rather sacrifice a little mpg and depend on my own eyesight and reflex. You hit from behind, it's going to be your fault.

 

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The Exhaust Gas Recirculation system reduces the combustion temperature of the engine and therefore reduces the efficiency and horsepower of the engine. The goal is to produce less NOx gases which can create ozone when reacting with sunlight.

Those of us outside an air attainment region don't need NOx reduction.

According to Toyota, the EGR is reduced at idle and light engine loads but is increased with higher engine load. If the EGR is not functioning, there is a risk of detonation. The ECU will reduce timing advance if it senses lack of EGR.

Being able to retune the ECU to max mileage, similar to the VW cheat method, might be the way to go.

 

 

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16 hours ago, fred heath said:

The only problem with that is your depending on the driver in front. I rather sacrifice a little mpg and depend on my own eyesight and reflex. You hit from behind, it's going to be your fault.

 

Very true and probably illegal. Only ever drafted once. Was driving north on Highway 101 in CA against a 30 mph head wind. I was driving the turbo sunrader. All by myself I really had to have my foot in it and was running max boost of about 7 pounds and about 50 mph. A truck got onto the freeway in front of me and I fell in behind. Boost almost dropped to zero with allot less foot in the pedal. Ran like that for about 40 miles. The trucker moved to the other lane to pass a slow car. I hesitated. Never could catch back up once I was back in the head wind. 

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Trucks typically drive @ 65mph+? So it's a question of whether you'll do better drafting at a safe distance @ 65mph+ vs cruising at 50-55mph. :)

myth2.jpg

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In California big rig speed limit is 55 and some drivers actually obey it. Much safer to draft at that speed. I've had some very good results staying behind trucks. I also think our rigs would benefit more that that chart since wind effects us so much more than cars

Linda S

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At 55 mph your traveling at approximately 80 fps (feet per second). The normal reaction time for a well rested, alert, non-distracted driver is approximately 3/4 second between your brain telling your foot to hit the brake, and actual activation of the brake. This means your vehicle has traveled a total of 60 feet. If your closer than 60' to the vehicle in front of you, chances are you will have contact.

 

 

In addition, a whole new set of factors come into play. Toyota mhs have notoriously small brakes in comparison to the amount of weight they have to stop. Chances are that TT with air/hydraulic brakes on all 10-14 travel wheels will stop much faster than your toy. So even if you try to make the argument your both traveling at the same speed your still on the deficit side.

Personally, the potential risk to my mh is not worth the savings in time and fuel by drafting.

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" In road tests, the testers achieved an almost 20% improvement in gas mileage at a distance of 100 feet (at 55 mph) and a 45% improvement at 10 feet."

" The recommended distance at 55 miles per hour is 150 feet."

" Conclusions: there are better ways to save fuel."

http://www.treehugger.com/cars/drafting-behind-trucks-does-it-work.html

myth2.jpg

http://www.autoblog.com/2007/10/28/mythbusters-drafting-10-feet-behind-a-big-rig-will-improve-mile/

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