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looking at my fsm now i see the inner seal only see a gasket behind axle flange on outside

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Where is the seal that actually rides on the axle and not the stationary stub? I can't find it.

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The axle shaft is solid.

There is no "stub".

This axle shaft is driven directly by the differential. See the spline ends? When rebuilding/repacking the hub, one must use caution when re-inserting the axle into the axle tube so as not to disrupt the seal.

The "Oil Seal" in the drawing is the seal that prevents diff oil from entering the hub.

The gasket on the end of the axle flange is actually a dust seal. It keeps dust/dirt from entering the hub from the outside.

I think once you tear yours down you will see how this all works. Toyota recommends repacking the greased bearings every 60,000 miles.

I have had this discussion before with GM/Ford/Chrysler guys who absolutely cannot believe Toyota does this. But they do.

I've repacked a number of 1-ton axles.

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looking at my fsm now i see the inner seal only see a gasket behind axle flange on outside

Yes, this is correct. See above reply to 'jdemaris'.

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Toyota recommends repacking the greased bearings every 60,000 miles.

Last time I looked (which was a year or so ago), the FSM Service Schedule only specifically says to repack the front bearings @ 30k mile. No mention of the rear bearings. Makes about as much sense as not allowing the diff oil to lubricate the bearing, of course!

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Last time I looked (which was a year or so ago), the Service Schedule only specifically says to repack the front bearings @ 60k mile. Makes about as much sense as not allowing the diff oil to lubricate the bearing, of course!

About how long it's been since I looked up the Schedule, too. I guess I just assumed 60K for the back also. My bad.

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Anyway, it certainly makes sense to inspect and repack the bearings any time you're working back in there (brakes).

You must have been posting while I was editing. The Schedule actually says 30k miles for the front. :)

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This is not entirely correct. The Full Floating Axle, commonly called the 1-ton axle used by our later model Toyota MH has an oil seal on the axle (to keep differential fluid from entering the wheel hub)

I see it in the parts diagram now. The seal that presses into the stationary stub. No seals in the truck hubs I just took apart. I don't know if someone intentionally left them out? No seal in either side and no oil leaked into brakes. In fact the hub assemblies weren't saturated with gear oil; just some presence of it.

What manual are the parts diagrams you posted from? I'd like to get one.

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The axle shaft is solid.

There is no "stub".

This axle shaft is driven directly by the differential. See the spline ends? When rebuilding/repacking the hub, one must use caution when re-inserting the axle into the axle tube so as not to disrupt the seal.

The "Oil Seal" in the drawing is the seal that prevents diff oil from entering the hub.

The oil seal in the drawing that I reposted and annotated in blue is not the seal that stops gear oil from entering the hub. That seal rotates with the hub and seals on the OD of that stationary stub. If the hub had oil in it, it would prevent the oil from leaking out onto the ground. The seal that actually stops oil flow from the center-section and into the hub assembly is on the outside on the ID of the stub. It is not shown in the parts diagram I reposted. It is shown on the next page down # SA128 in plates RA0802, RA0712, etc.

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I see it in the parts diagram now. The seal that presses into the stationary stub.

What manual are the parts diagrams you posted from? I'd like to get one.

Hmmm, don't know exactly what a stationary hub is. Are you sure you have a Toyota 1-ton axle assembly?

The late model Toyota manual is available online at:

http://personal.utulsa.edu/~nathan-buchanan/93fsm/

I downloaded the entire thing a few years back. I'm glad to see it's still available online.

Another one you might enjoy:

http://www.autoshop101.com/

Check out the Technical Section.

Happy Wrenchin'!

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Hmmm, don't know exactly what a stationary hub is. Are you sure you have a Toyota 1-ton axle assembly?

The late model Toyota manual is available online at:

http://personal.utul...buchanan/93fsm/

I downloaded the entire thing a few years back. I'm glad to see it's still available online.

Another one you might enjoy:

http://www.autoshop101.com/

Check out the Technical Section.

Happy Wrenchin'!

I said stationary "stub", not "hub." The stationary stub is what the entire hub assembly rides on. The stub is stationary and the hub rotates along with the wheel. The end of the stub has a small seal at end diven into the ID of it. The end of the axle near the end-cap rides in that seal. All full-floating axles have stational stubs sticking out regardless of Toyota, Dana, Rockwell, etc. The one I have apart right now is from a 1986 dual wheel full-floating axle from a box-truck. VIN: RN75L-SDIEA3W 033L041G292A43D

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I said staionary "stub", not "hub." The stationary stub is what the entire hub assembly rides on. The stub is stationary and the hub rotates along with the wheel. The end of the stub has a small seal at end diven into the ID of it. The end of the axle near the end-cap rides in that seal. All full-floating axles have stational stubs sticking out regardless of Toyota, Dana, Rockwell, etc. The one I have apart right now is from a 1986 dual wheel full-floating axle from a box-truck. VIN: RN75L-SDIEA3W 033L041G292A43D

Aaahaa! Got it. Thanks for that bit about hubs.

I did not know that the full floater was available in '86. I see the VIN shows it to be a 4.10 ratio. How do I cipher it's a 1-ton floater?

Thanks.

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The hub seal that does NOT seal the axle shaft OD is National # 226285 or SKF # 24635. 3.35" OD and 2.4" ID where it seals on the hub-stub.

That is correct. The "Oil Seal", depicted in SA127 seals diff oil from the greased bearings. Not the axle shaft gasket.

Please do not post your knowledege of Dana or whatevever american axles you choose to define.

This is a Toyota blog, do not apply your many years of 'Merican experience on an Asian blog. It simply does not apply.

Toyota has in it's infinite wisdom chosen a different path. If you choose to ignore it, we will choose to ignore you.

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I know this has been discussed, but as a reminder. In every floating axle I've ever heard of, the bearings are lubricated by differential fluid.

HOWEVER, in the Toyota axle, this is NOT the case, the bearings are hand packed with grease and do not have access to differential fluid.

There is a small seal inside the axle tube that seals the axle shaft. This is not shown in the "SA" drawings, but is referenced in step #2 on page SA-127 ... "When removing the axle shaft, be careful not to damage the oil seal..." .. There is also a replacement procedure for this seal on page SA-128.

You can see the oil seal in these two photos, easily overlooked if you don't know its there.

post-4544-0-79796200-1353408651_thumb.jp post-4544-0-85185000-1353408667_thumb.jp

The seal on the back of the brake drum keeps grease out of the brakes.

post-4544-0-11060500-1353408890_thumb.jp

There has been discussion regarding leaving this seal out, and allowing differential fluid to enter the bearing area. Personally, I would not remove this seal unless I had a new one to install. If it leaks a little, so be it.

John Mc

88 Dolphin 4 Auto

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That is correct. The "Oil Seal", depicted in SA127 seals diff oil from the greased bearings. Not the axle shaft gasket.

Please do not post your knowledege of Dana or whatevever american axles you choose to define.

This is a Toyota blog, do not apply your many years of 'Merican experience on an Asian blog. It simply does not apply.

Toyota has in it's infinite wisdom chosen a different path. If you choose to ignore it, we will choose to ignore you.

Japanese auto companies e.g. Toyota and Datsun did much of their engineering by copying what has worked in other parts of the world. That includes a lot of stuff that originated in the USA. And to be fair - a lot of USA stuff got copied from auto design in early France.

The Toyota full-floater is very much like a Dana full-floater. Just smaller.

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I know this has been discussed, but as a reminder. In every floating axle I've ever heard of, the bearings are lubricated by differential fluid.

HOWEVER, in the Toyota axle, this is NOT the case, the bearings are hand packed with grease and do not have access to differential fluid.

Whoever last worked on this Toyota full-floater left the said seals out. I don't know if it was thought of as an intentional "upgrade" or a mistake. Regardless, this thing worked fine and did not leak any oil into the brakes with those seals left out. Oil from the center-section travels along the axle towards the outside. If the small seal at the axle-end is not there to stop it - it deposits itself in the hub assembly and can't leak out anywhere due to the the big hub seal on the inside . . ; and the axle-end-gasket on the outside. I'm not saying leaving the seals out is better or worse then OEM. I am saying I'm seeing proof that it works. I got this four-cylinder 1986 dually full-floater from an art dealer. The rear brakes and hubs have not been apart for 40K miles and there are no leaks. The bearings are still packed with grease but a little "dampened" by gear oil also.

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The late model Toyota manual is available online at:

http://personal.utul...buchanan/93fsm/

I downloaded the entire thing a few years back. I'm glad to see it's still available online.

Another one you might enjoy:

http://www.autoshop101.com/

Check out the Technical Section.

Happy Wrenchin'!

Thanks for posting those links. I have piles of Toyota factory shop manuals but nothing newer then 1980. For newer stuff I only have the generic manuals from Motors, Cylmers, etc.

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The 1985 & 1988 FSMs are also online. Should you need them.

There don't seem to be any older than that. If you've got one, I'm sure it would be appreciated by many if you could contribute a Pdf copy. :)

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for shim and bucket said did not know the full floater was available in 1986 my Dolphin chassis date March 86 is six lug full floating rear and six lug front. I figure it must one of the first full one ton front and rear.

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... chassis date march 86 is six lug full floating rear and six lug front i figure it must one of the first full one ton front and rear.

That is surprising to hear. Maybe next time you're walking by you can double (triple) check. The March '86 date is what's marked on the Toyota sticker, right? If I ever quote your date and some doubter says 'he must be wrong', I'd like to be able to say 'he double checked!'. :)

I suppose, of course, that a previous owner did the front upgrade!

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That is surprising to hear. Maybe next time you're walking by you can double (triple) check. The March '86 date is what's marked on the Toyota sticker, right? If I ever quote your date and some doubter says 'he must be wrong', I'd like to be able to say 'he double checked!'. :)

I suppose, of course, that a previous owner did the front upgrade!

I just cut apart a Toyota dual wheel full-floater rear truck made in November, 1986. I have no title so do not know if it was sold as model year 1986 or 1987. Has a fuel-injected 2.4 four cylinder engine and auto trans. 86,000 miles. I paid $500, stripped it and sold the scrap-metal for $175. The full-floater rear with 4.10 ratio is going into my little 1978 Toyota Chinook. Same with the 6 lug, 7.25 bolt circle front hubs.

Dual wheel Toyota truck. Paid $450 fo it. 86,000 miles with a 2.4 fuel injected engine and an auto trans. VIN: RN75L-SDIEA3W 033L041G292A43D

Manufactured in November, 1986

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1986 dual wheel Toyota truck. Paid $450 fo it. 86,000 miles with a 2.4 fuel injected engine and an auto trans. VIN: RN75L-SDIEA3W 033L041G292A43D

Manufactured in November, 1986

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holy crap that has a FAT spring pack jde...

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I just cut apart a Toyota dual wheel full-floater rear truck made in November, 1986. I have no title so do not know if it was sold as model year 1986 or 1987. Has a fuel-injected 2.4 four cylinder engine and auto trans. 86,000 miles. I paid $500, stripped it and sold the scrap-metal for $175. The full-floater rear with 4.10 ratio is going into my little 1978 Toyota Chinook. Same with the 6 lug, 7.25 bolt circle front hubs.

Dual wheel Toyota truck. Paid $450 fo it. 86,000 miles with a 2.4 fuel injected engine and an auto trans. VIN: RN75L-SDIEA3W 033L041G292A43D

Manufactured in November, 1986

Three photos did not work. I'll try again.

100_0538sm.jpg

100_0539sm.jpg

100_0533sm.jpg

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YES DEREK I HAVE REPEATLY CHECKED IT MYSELF.MARCH 1986.THE NATIONAL R V CAMPER PART IS DATED SEPT 1987 so the title says 1987

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