Gulfstream Greg

Toyota Motorhome Axle Facts!

284 posts in this topic

That's certainly not a common 'foolie' installation and I'd be surprised if you're going to find anyone soon that just might happen to have left over bits lying around.

If you've read all the 11 pages of this thread, I assume you're fully aware of the risks involved in continuing to use them. I also assume you're over 18 years old. :)

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Your assumption of age is correct.  I'm also within the weight and length parameters, and only need to replace a few nuts and bolts that were overtightened.  Also, it's just the wife and I, so we're going to use the overcab as storage and use the bed at the back when we're parked and on jacks, keeping the traveling weight over the front.

 

Thanks

Jim

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An 18' Sunrader is considered short and light by many. Here's a photo of one from late last year. Possibly the softest 'landing' after a snapped axle.

15726712_911097567863_7558610131401369900_n.jpg

15823287_911097582833_2395801456165428297_n.jpg

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Just a FYI. The axle assembly you have appears to be the Toyota GO82 with the 8" differential. They no longer make replacement axle shafts for this unit.

If your determined to use "as is" I suggest you get a tow policy and don't drive any further from your house then you can be towed. Also drive slowly. If you break an axle at any kind of speed, it could be very bad!!!!!

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I appreciate the warnings, and I'm generally a cautious person.  This is not a cross country rig, just a local tootle around for the wife and I.  It's an unmodified camper, and the rear end is in really good shape.  I even have a rig I could tow it around with if I needed, but it runs well, drives smooth, and I'm currently maintaining it..  I normally travel at 50 mph max, because it's comfortable.  I'm not climbing mountains, just driving on the Prairies.  Not sure if I will replace the axle or not, but not today.

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OooK. You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink

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8 hours ago, 82okanagan said:

I appreciate the warnings, and I'm generally a cautious person.  This is not a cross country rig, just a local tootle around for the wife and I.  It's an unmodified camper, and the rear end is in really good shape.  I even have a rig I could tow it around with if I needed, but it runs well, drives smooth, and I'm currently maintaining it..  I normally travel at 50 mph max, because it's comfortable.  I'm not climbing mountains, just driving on the Prairies.  Not sure if I will replace the axle or not, but not today.

You can extend the life of the axle and yourself by removing the dually set up and using a single wheel in the back. It's that long extension putting stress on the bearings that causes most of the problems. Your camper is little and correct D load range tires should be plenty to support the weight of your camper. I had an Okanagan Van that my daughter and I traveled the country with. Named her Gypsy and we still talk about her. Great rig

Linda S

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My 1984 New Horizon Toyota missed the rear axcel recall and I was unaware of the problem when I purchased it in 2014.   After adding 18,000 miles in 18 months, a near disaster occurred on the 101 in N. Calif.  It had 78,000 miles on it at that point. I heard a clicking noise and was able to pull over and saw that one of outside rear tire rims was cracking. I limped into a local mechanic and a Les Schwab shop. They could do nothing and could not get a local machineshop to assume responsibility for trying to fix it. On the internet, they could find no used axcels in western US. So, I slowly made it back to Arizona on 3 rear wheels. After a long search, I finally found a junkyard in Phoenix that had a 6 lug rear axcel. They replaced the defective axcel for $1500, parts and labor. Since then, I've driven it for an additional 6,000 miles with no problems.

 

 

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