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was this a 1.3 liter crx? thats very rare in itself but it makes the short list of vehicles a toyhome could tow.

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No, it was Honda Civic 1.5 liter DX 3 door hatchback.

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Although, I do not know how long this camper had an a/c on the roof, I do know that the generator and the tool box has only been on it on one trip from SC to AL. It was installed by the mechanic who prepared ths vehicle for its maiden voyage after it has been sitting in the field for about a year.

I already bought the front and rear shocks as well as an add-a-leaf kit (short) but not the front springs. I will remove all of the heavy stuff from it, however, it is probably not going to happen until spring because it is quite cold, rainy and windy to patch the hole on the roof with a fiberglass.

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Although, I do not know how long this camper had an a/c on the roof, I do know that the generator and the tool box has only been on it on one trip from SC to AL. It was installed by the mechanic who prepared ths vehicle for its maiden voyage after it has been sitting in the field for about a year.

I already bought the front and rear shocks as well as an add-a-leaf kit (short) but not the front springs. I will remove all of the heavy stuff from it, however, it is probably not going to happen until spring because it is quite cold, rainy and windy to patch the hole on the roof with a fiberglass.

The hole in your roof will fit a standard size RV 14x14 roof vent.

Linda S

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Ooh...yeah, that actually makes me a bit jealous. Another roof vent is a good idea if I had a pre-existing hole. But I don't think I'd cut a new one in my roof.

I hear you on the weather. Montana is officially in winter. Single digits the last few nights. No work with adhesives or anything like that until spring...unless I can find someone with a large heated garage, or maybe I could throw a space heater inside for a few hours and do some work then. There are still a few things I never got to that I really wanted to get done this year.

Not to alarm you, and maybe you already know this, but you really need to do a major check of everything on that vehicle. It's old, and it sat for a while. Two "bad" things.

If you haven't already, I'd go through all these things:

Engine:

hoses

belts

water and oil pump

radiator

full tuneup (valve adjustment, spark plugs, wire, distributer cap and rotor, fuel filter, timing)

Carb adjustments or rebuild

Wiring:

Especially the battery isolator and main power wires. My + wire from the battery to the converter looked like this

post-6535-0-74698500-1385315592_thumb.jp

Not cool...and I wasn't planning on touching the wiring. The connectors on these Chinooks are not good. They used clam connectors to splice wires together and it's just not a good connection. You'd have to gut the camper to replace all the wiring, but any wire you can access, like the main + and -, you may want to inspect. I only noticed this after pulling the whole wire.

Tranny stuff:

change all the gearbox oil. Transmission and rear diff. Look for a lot of metal shavings or worse...chunks. Some is normal. But either way, there's a good chance this hasn't been done in decades.

Axles:

get those front and rear bearings checked out, along with axles seals, so they don't start (if they aren't already) leaking axle oil onto your brakes.

And the whole brake system. Check the wheel cylinders. Have the ball joints checked out, and the whole front end for play.

A nice local shop will check all the mechanical stuff for probably an hours worth of charges. Somewhere around $30-$100 is well worth it to get a list of what's about to go, what you need to keep an eye on, and what's fine.

Even with fairly good owners, after 35 years, some things on these RVs have been neglected. It's ok to neglect a 10 or even 20 year old vehicle. But lucky us...by 30+ years, all those things that have been neglected refuse to be neglected anymore. You ARE going to sink some serious money into this thing if you plan to keep it and take it on road trips.

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Just so you know, my rear suspension was pretty bad, but my Chinook sat level. Sounds like yours is worse. With one full add-a-leaf kit I didn't gain much height. I only gained stability back. Maybe 1/2" height after everything settled.

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If you're going to do something to the rear end, change the spring bushings. The change is remarkable when the springs and shocks work together.

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Thank you for a good advice, Zach! Most of the preliminary tune up items have been done by the first mechanic. He checked all of the fuel lines, changed all of the belts, put on new tires with new discs and replaced rear brakes. He also repacked all of the suspension joints with a new grease. Later on I replaced the master brake cylinder and even later the master brake cylinder booster. Recently, I replaced my Carburetor with a Weber 32/36 Echoke. That is where I discovered that the left manifold (where the Carburetor was mounted on was clogged up with black substance so that I had to use a screw driver to clear it up from one end to the other using a carb cleaner. I probably need to replace the gasket on the manifold because it was quite worn out. And then I will have to go through all of my wires and through all of my suspension parts and brake lines. So, I know there is more money to put into it. I already spent a little over then $10,000 on the repairs.

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I am still looking for the new leaf spring pack for my 1978 Toyota Chinook Newport. I looked on the General Spring site but they only start their sets at 1979. Considering that my vehicle was manufactured in 1977 and marked as 1978, I assume some things were changed. Also, what year Saab coil springs should I look for in the front of my RV?

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I am still looking for the new leaf spring pack for my 1978 Toyota Chinook Newport. I looked on the General Spring site but they only start their sets at 1979. Considering that my vehicle was manufactured in 1977 and marked as 1978, I assume some things were changed. Also, what year Saab coil springs should I look for in the front of my RV?

Measure your springs and compare them to measurements from General Springs. Only way to tell if they will fit. Some other vehicles might also have compatible springs but you need to know what size.

Like this

http://www.eatondetroitspring.com/how-to-measure-leaf-springs/

Post all measurements and maybe someone will have some ideas

Linda S

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That's a good question Derek. That's the part from Rock Auto which is the correct spring, listed for Saabs.

And my way of not digging all the way back to JD's post to find the actual link I used to buy my springs...but I only got lazy because my internet slowed down so much I couldn't do anything...

I'll find the actual link.

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I would look for LT (light truck)

185R14 d rated tires are the ticket. stay away from car tires!

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Yeah I know 4x4s are kind of dogs with 31s on them. They aren't geared for it. The biggest you can go without feeling a real noticeable effect is 30x9.50. Once you go to 31x10.5...you don't have to regear, but really should. You'll really notice it on hills.

Stock for 4x4s is 225 75 R15, I think.

30x9.50 = 235 75 R15. So 31s are even bigger still.

Stock for 2wd is 185 R14.

I know a guy on the Yahoo Chinook site has 30x9.50s on his 2wd Chinook. He has two extra leaf springs on each side in the back, and longer shocks.

So I'm guessing you'll need a lift to get 31s to fit.

Hi Zach,

I'm trying to figure out some winter tires for my 78 Chinook. Mine sits nice and level (it has added leafs and new shocks in the back) any suggestions?

Or anyone really?

Thanks

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Hi Zach,

I'm trying to figure out some winter tires for my 78 Chinook. Mine sits nice and level (it has added leafs and new shocks in the back) any suggestions?

Or anyone really?

Thanks

What's on it now and are they duallies in the back or single. Weight of your rig is important too. You might be able to go with a lower load range for less money.

Linda S

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Someone posted a link to some Wrangler A/T tires a few months back, which actually had some fairly aggressive tread (at least as aggressive as I've seen in 185/14)...can't remember where though. I'll look around.

Are you really gonna drive that thing in the winter?? I can't imagine getting it out of a fishtail...and they definitely just start sliding as soon as you hit the brakes on slippery roads.

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I asked about the weight and tire set up cause these would probably work. At 1400 lbs load they are probably plenty for your little rig and they are stud able and best part they are super cheap. Darn my computer upgraded and I can't copy and paste anymore. Search Firestone Winterforce tires at Tire rack. Size 195/75/14. 55 bucks

Linda S

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