Jump to content
bajadulce

1995 3.4L 5sp 4x4 Bajarader (Put the sawzall down)

Recommended Posts

I think making the frame as stiff as possibe and letting it float on the truck frame would the way to go. If you really get in to bad roads think about using bushing between the frame and truck and between the camper and frame. That way would get room for 2x the flex before it gets to your camper.

Bushings are cheap.

For a truck can you make a removable flatbed too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been awhile since I posted here. Summer has been busy, but managed to do a few things. The floor was eventually made of a honeycomb structure made of 1x's and 1/2" plywood glued and screwed to it. This entire honeycomb was then fiberglassed as well as 3 layers of a decent matte glassed to the floor's topside. It was really cheap, extremely simple to fabricate and relatively light weight. Not as lightweight as aluminum framing or some fancy laminate composite such as Nidacore, but It should perform fine.

post-385-12511880427954_thumb.jpg

I ended up moving a bunch of windows around and removing the front curved ones completely.

post-385-12511880708553_thumb.jpg

I scrounged all over some local junkyards looking for a camper to salvage fiberglass from, but without any luck. Instead, I've made my own sheet out of this shower board (FRP) by glassing 2 additional layers of fabric to the back side (the textured side for this use). Here's a picture of the panel held in place while it's glassed to the stringers/camper shell from the inside.

post-385-12511880810166_thumb.jpgpost-385-12511880617838_thumb.jpg

So that's where the project is at. Lots of fiberglass has been done, but still tons more to do. I've yet to do any welding, but have located 4 hydraulic corner jacks now. After the jacks are installed on the camper, the truck can roll back under the shell again to get a better idea of what needs to be done in terms of the flatbed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice work, can't wait to see you on the road. What about a roll back roof so you can see the stars at night!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no idea where you could fine the parts and pieces, but back in the 70s good ol GM build some Nova and such like with a cloth sun roof. You would slide and fold the roof cloth back and open a BIG hole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That Nova sounds like a fun car for the beach. I always wanted one of those older VW bugs that had a cloth sunroof myself while growing up in SoCal. I think they went to the hard sunroof in 64.

369768943_d7dab11fb3.jpg?v=0

Here's some rudimentary pics of the jack system. A steel plate was added to each of the 8 ears. The plywood forms are glassed to both sides of shell inside and out. They were run a bit wild so they could be cut off plumb once all the glass set.

post-385-0-29090800-1337183150_thumb.jpgpost-385-0-39378400-1337183158_thumb.jpgpost-385-0-12653600-1337183167_thumb.jpg

post-385-0-33382400-1337183177_thumb.jpgpost-385-0-50604600-1337183030_thumb.jpgpost-385-0-49777400-1337183044_thumb.jpg

I guess it's time to do some investigation as to what tires I should put on this. Right now I have 31's x 10.5 x 15. Once I get the flatbed legal, I'll be excited to weigh the truck w/ the camper and without it in its gutted state.

Alright thnx to all that have helped and offered opinions/feedback. I know my activity on this board is a bit sporadic and I disappear for long lengths of time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The VW roof design is what I was thinking of for your Moon Roof.

The easy answer for your tire is to run what you got, but change the axle ratio to 4.56. It would be within a percent or so of being correct and still give you ground clearance. It is also an easy tire size to find should you need a tire fast. Maybe check the build plate and see what ratio was factory and then check your truck, many times the P/O will have changed the ratios to keep from bogging down off road when the big tires were added.

I supposed that a camping weight is really needed before trying out new tires. The ones you have now are LT rated for 2200lb each.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Block the truck so it can't roll. Jack up one rear wheel. Put a piece of tape on the drive shaft and rear wheel. Put trannie in neutral and turn the rear wheel one complete turn. Count the drive shaft turns. Then I forget :Poster_oops: either divide by 2 or multiply by 2 to get ratio. You will know which way to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you rotate your tire two (2) complete revolutions then the number of revolutions which your drive shaft made is your gear ratio. So if you turn the tire only one time, then you will need to multiply the drive shaft revolutions by 2 to obtain your ratio.

Note if you have LSD posi traction, you will need to raise both tires off the ground to enable you to spin the tire. Then only rotate the tire one revolution.

Here are two interesting links dealing with Toyota differential gear ratios:

http://home.4x4wire.com/erik/diffs/

http://www.off-road.com/trucks4x4/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=274535

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thnx for the links.

The shaft seemed to go around 8 5/8 turns per 2 tire revolutions. According to Erik's link I wouldn't divide by 2 as I don't imagine I have limited slip (I only had one wheel off the ground), but this seems way off the charts?

Dividing by 2 as WME suggested, yields ~ 4.3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thnx for the links.

The shaft seemed to go around 8 5/8 turns per 2 tire revolutions. According to Erik's link I wouldn't divide by 2 as I don't imagine I have limited slip (I only had one wheel off the ground), but this seems way off the charts?

Dividing by 2 as WME suggested, yields ~ 4.3

Have you driven this truck yet, with the large tires? If you have a tach, What does it tach at 60 mph in high gear, not overdrive. So if it is a 5 spd manual, use 4th gear for this test? Looks like you could build yourself a monster truck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HUMMMMM. The books I have show 3.9, 4.11, 4.56, 4.88.

Get some help, jack up both rear tires and make 1 turn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HUMMMMM. The books I have show 3.9, 4.11, 4.56, 4.88.

Get some help, jack up both rear tires and make 1 turn.

Just a thought, if you have a friend helping, and if it is a "LSD, limited slip differential" / "posi traction differential" where as Eric suggests that one (1) tire revolution will supply the ratio results, http://home.4x4wire.com/erik/diffs/

Try rotating the tire ten (10) revolutions for better accuracy, while counting the number of turns / spins on the drive shaft. The results could easily be divided by 10 by simply moving the decimal one place to the left in the results.

39.0 = 3.90

41.0 = 4.10

45.6 = 4.56

48.8 = 4.88

52.9 = 5.29

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you driven this truck yet, with the large tires? If you have a tach, What does it tach at 60 mph in high gear, not overdrive. So if it is a 5 spd manual, use 4th gear for this test? Looks like you could build yourself a monster truck!

Well it idles nice. As soon as I fabricate a rear bumper, add some lights, and obtain a temp moving permit, I can take it for a test run.
Try rotating the tire ten (10) revolutions for better accuracy, while counting the number of turns / spins on the drive shaft.
That's a good idea. My first test could have been faulty as I didn't put a whole lot of energy into it to be honest. I put some chalk on one of the Ujoints and drew a line across the tire. The testing was pretty primative.

Thnx for the feedback.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ummm a 3:00 in the morning thought. After you find the rear ratio you might want to check the front ratio, ya never know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, ya crossing fingers that the front diff matches. Sorry haven't done the 10 rotation test yet, so nothing new to report. I'm trying to get the truck street legal so it can be road tested and will report.

Progress:

Got a simple frame fabricated for the flatbed. It's a tad over 5 feet wide. I couldn't place the flatbed any closer to the frame as it actually rests on the frame rails at the highest point above the axle. The box bumper was salvaged from the Sunrader and cut down a bit in width.

post-385-12522074886784_thumb.jpg

I'm hoping to add some LED all-in-one tail, stop, turn light assembly and found a decent deal @ vehiclelight.com that includes shipping. A quick peek at my wiring shows about 8 wires and the lights in this catalog have 3 wires. So some simplifying will need to take place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the bed a sheet of 3/4" marine plywood. Use garage floor epoxy paint on all sides.

Don't forget a few flush D rings in floor to tie things to when its a truck. Also maybe some pockets on the frame sides to make a stake-bed to haul lots of stuff.

Your going to need some sort of alignment pin set up to things back together. I think that the tie down loads should be to the floor and not to the fiberglass sides.

I pull a trailer with my Toy and used a taillight converter to match things. I was replacing the convert every 2 years or so. I finally gave up and wired in another set of tail lights on the trailer so I didn't need a converter any more

Your taillight look like they are 2 hot and 1 ground. If you could add a single light as a running or an amber one as turn it would make things an easier hook up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found myself with some extra 1/2 inch 5-ply sheeting. A friend in the waterproofing business gave me some scrap fiberglass matting, so I put 2 layers on the bottom side and if it lasts a couple of years great. Not like replacing the plywood is a big deal. I chose 1/2" because it seemed plenty thick enough for my application.

One issue I might have is one of the exhaust pipes is only 3 or 4 inches from the fiberglass laminated plywood. Should I shield that?

Some angle iron was cut into little L brackets and were tacked around the inside of the frame for carriage bolts.

post-385-1252640058494_thumb.jpgpost-385-12526401239397_thumb.jpg

Thnx for the feedback/suggestions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1/2" Marine Ply would be 9 ply. Its also called cabinet ply or Birch cabinet ply

On the exhaust make a simple shield like most Toys have over the catalytic converter. Just make sure there is also an air gap between the shield and floor. OR Summitracing.com and search exhaust wrap.

The only reason I said to use the floor as an attachment point is that your shell is a lot of pieces, wouldn't want to break it in half on a big bump. :Poster_oops:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah cabinet plywood is referred to as marine plywood.

@ attachment points:

The camper is 7' wide whereas the flatbed is about 5', so the floor is the only viable solution it would seem anyways.

@ camper breaking in two:

Didn't Herbie the love bug cross the finish line in two halves in that famous Disney Movie? :)

I'm not too worried about the sides failing at their seams. They have heavy weaved glass fused to both sides as well as the roof and floor adding additional perimeter support.

Gas Filler:

I ended up having to temporarily lower my gas tank by about 2 inches as there didn't seem to be enough slope with the filler tube below the frame. Will have to come up with something better in the future.

post-385-12526442804866_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really starting to look good!

What about a larger 26 gal tank? Fill it up before you cross the boarder? Normally the filler is up into the shell of the coach. If there was a way to create a quick disconnect for the filler, anyhow my point is that it would be nice to keep the tank high for rock clearance. Is that the filler I see directly above the jack?

Another question, what year is the truck. Our 91 2w drive has the exhaust coming out on the drivers side. I recently installed a larger exhaust system from the cat back. A kit from JCWhitney. Also available from Summit Racing. Chose JC as they pay return shipping if it does not fit. Only mod I really had to do was add a extension to the end. The end does not extend out far enough past the coach side. I sawzalled off the chrome tip and welded in a piece between the two to keep the chrome tip. The system used all the original toyota hangers which I feel is a huge plus! Sounds great and I do have more power. Can not really say if the extra power would be there for all because someone had scabbed on smaller than OEM pipe from the muffler back the the end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thnx Greg. Yes, you sure like your exhaust mods! I've never had one till now, so will be anxious to test out the truck.

26 gallons would be a nice mod.

The truck originally was a 94 extra cab. The new single cab I have no idea what year exactly, but somewhere in the 89-94 generation. The flomaster exhaust system actually has 2 pipes. The kid I bought this truck from must have spent some good coin on this. Looks like a newer cat, OXY sensor, chrome tips etc.

post-385-12527361572059_thumb.jpg

Yes, that's the filler above the jack. I'll definitely have to invest some time in this gas tank project in the future, but it works for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would think the tank filler would need to be at least 6 inches above the top of the tank, just a guess.

On Portola is Genos wreckers, they have a bunch of 4 runners and some pickups and get them in on a regular basis. Got a bunch of my AC parts there. They want $75 for a tach dash and I am considering getting one. Only concern I have is the mileage on one. All that I looked at had 130K plus and mine has 85K. Not sure if there is a way to change that. Anyhow much of the 4 runner stuff will swap over but not all.

That exhaust looks really nice, I would keep it! You might though consider extending the ends to get them past the edge of the coach to keep the nasty fumes out.

Your flatbed frame looks really nice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Escaper has a fill hose made up of Gas filler hose and prebent exhaust tubing.

Maybe a couple of 90 deg bends and you could bring the filler out forward of its present path.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update:

Got a new temperature sensor today and got it smogged! It's now registered, insured, and has 2010 tags! Oh and some new shocks too. Still haven't got it on the freeway or out of 3rd gear yet. Some fenders are in order now.

Extra:

Haven't gone off the tangent in a long time, so here's some more fun filler for the thread. I don't do facebook, twitter, blogs, or any of that stuff and I don't watch TV, so I post here for fun when I'm bored out of my mind. :)

Just a little over 20 years ago, I ventured to baja as a 19 year old in a little 1963 6volt red VW bug and stumbled on a man in his mid 40's (my age now) boondocking at a remote wind swept point. Glen Horn is a surfer/shaper, environmentalist, craftsman, and an all around mystical shaman-like kind of guy that has that certain aura that is hard to describe. As a 19 year old rookie getting slammed by the elements of this harsh environment in my flimsy tent, it was Glen's home-built converted step van that inspired all of my past campers from VW buses, to V8 dodge chinooks, and even a trailer. Glen's 1955 stepvan camper has changed a bit over the past 20 years, but it is still the same red beacon parked at the same spot it has been every winter. Considering that the salty sea spray a mere 20 yards away, pummels this car for 4-5 months a year for the past 20 years, it is a testament to the dedication to the rig and how simple handcrafted and well built things far outlast the shiny and new that eventually fall apart and fade away.

Recently I was "surfing" the net and came across an article in a surfing journal about Glen. I thought about all the recent full timer threads I've read here and about how some have wished they had larger motorhomes; that 20+ feet just isn't enough room. I think it's a matter of a being more creative in the way we carry all of our junk. The thing that makes Glen's camper so unique, is that it is designed to live around and outside of as much as it is inside. Well I could go on and on about Glen and his camper, but I'll just leave some pics from the article itself. You might be able to read some of the article if you squint a little.

post-385-0-74640200-1320077717_thumb.jpg

post-385-0-80303800-1320077725_thumb.jpg

post-385-0-02844000-1320077740_thumb.jpg

post-385-0-46493800-1320077749_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BajaD,

That is "livin' the dream"! Thanks for sharing Glen with us.

s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×