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I rode my bike across the city to one of the only open auto parts stores we have here. Showed them my old one and gave them the part number of the Bilstein. I'm naive, but I trusted the 'expert' behind the counter who gave me a bunch of options and explained how each works and doesn't for my application.

I settled on the one I got after listening to him and weighing all the pros and cons.
Not ideal, but will be fine for now.
I just can't and won't spend $5K on all the various mechanical things I need to get this up and running for inspection. I have to pick and choose some battles.

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At least give us the part numbers for the Monroe so we can check them for you. Or better yet here are the right Monroe shocks for our vehicles and you can check them yourself. Substitutes won't do.

Linda S

 

 Manufacturer: Monroe  Brand: Gas-Magnum
tran.gif
Part Number Position Package Qty
 
34953.jpg
 34953
Front 1 Regular Price: $45.72
Our Price: $36.57 each

Save 20%
Free Shipping
On Orders $75+
 
 
34803.jpg
 34803
Rear 1 Regular Price: $46.32
Our Price: $37.05 each

Save 20%
Free Shipping
On Orders $75+
 
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Yes, the front shocks are the Monroe 34953 Gas-Magnum Shock Absorber. And I just finished getting them on. All good. I need to get in better shape. :)
And the steering damper is this one https://www.amazon.ca/Monroe-SC2914-Magnum-Steering-Damper/dp/B000C53XES
I got the Damper on now. Tough to get that bolt out, but finally figured out a way.

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hello again. re: SHOCKS

And... apologies Jay for completely taking over your original thread here.... :)
Can anyone please advise me if I need to take any special precautions, or do I need any special tools to remove the rear shocks on my 1986 Sunrader?

There are coils on the outside of the old shocks on there now.

Ok, pulled one off without a problem. But second one has a stripped top bolt pinched up tight to the bottom of the floor.

 

 

Thank you. Rick

Edited by canadasunrader
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Springs on shocks are either way cool new school hot rod coil overs or really old school clamp on overloads. The overloads were a cheap way to level up the rear end.

Are you saying the nut is rounded off or that the threads are stripped and the nut won't back off?

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Thank you.

I am installing the Monroe 34803 in the back. Basic, but recommended.

I was asking about the coils because this is my first experience with shocks and I just wasn't exactly sure how they came off.
Part of me was worried it was going to be like a jack in the box apon pulling the bolts off. But everything came off fine on the first one, and the replacement went in fine.

On the second one the bottom bolt came off easy. It is the top bolt where the problem lies. It is tight up against the floor. The floor has dropped down a bit and won't allow a ratchet in there.

The nut is rounded and everything I've tried so far has failed to get it to budge.

Tried heating it up, banging it with a chisel etc etc. Also, it's hard to get at because the muffler is close beside it.

 

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Make sure that the MH is chocked and blocked. Take the needed length of 2x4 and jack up the floor just enough for a socket to fit.

They make a weird socket just for stripped nuts, here is an example..https://www.amazon.com/Nut-Bolt-Extractor-Tool-Set/dp/B07YZ9SC5S/ref=sr_1_25?crid=2UP7H5PJ39CT&dchild=1&keywords=stripped+nut+remover+kit&qid=1591243884&sprefix=stripped+nut%2Caps%2C237&sr=8-25

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Yes, an impact wrench would have been good, but no way.

As you can see, the floor has sagged down around the top of the shock.

I went to the old reliable Canadian Tire where I found a pack of six nut bolt extractors on sale for 75% off.

That and jacking up the floor did the trick. Finally got the nut/bolt out, but getting the new shock on and a bolt back on was equally fun.

While it is satisfying work once over with, I am glad I don't do this every day for a living.

IMG_4893.jpg

IMG_4897.jpg

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No worries Rick! Looks like it was quite the pain but you were successful in the end! I think I have a similar problem in the rear that the floor has sagged over one of the top shock bolts, but for now I'm leaving those problems for another time haha.

 

Glad you were able to work through those problems and get it fixed.

 

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Posted (edited)

Managed to get the cabover area pretty much done except for filling in the gap and some minor detail work, now I'll start working on the main cabin and figuring all that out.

 

 

 

 

20200608_203624.jpg

Edited by JaySam
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  • 2 weeks later...

Jay. This looks so good. How is all the wood attached at the front? Mine is still sitting unfinished. This looks like it may be an answer.
Also.... did you say that you replaced your insert trim on the outside? Which width did you go with? I measured mine at 3/4" and so far it's hard to find.
I am having a hell of a time getting some of the screws out. The entire front section of them will not budge. Looks like they have been sitting in water for 40 years.
Most of the sides and back have come out.
Did you just cover the ones that stripped with a little goop and moved on?
Mine are so rusty I am reluctant to just leave them.... but I've tried everything to get them out and no way.
And.... all good here. I finally got my inspection competed so I will be on the road soon.
Rick
 

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Looks really great Jay.  I like the indirect lighting and the little shelf.   The natural wood is a good look.

 

The state allowed us to open back up so I am back to 13 & 14 hour days. So, it looks like fall before I get much more done, unless I squeeze in a little here and there.  

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Thanks guys, I'm pretty pleased with how it turned out. Also learning about the wonderful world of varnishing and the pitfalls of it all. 

 

I glued furring strips along the front, one the entire length above the windows about 1" and another below the windows 1", and a strip down the middle connecting the two. Then I screwed the cedar planking into those. The bottom slope of cedar isn't screwed into anything, the upper lip slides under the furring strip and along the bottom I used a few screws to tack it down. I put 2" board foam underneath for a bit of support and warmth. I used a gorilla glue similar to liquid nails but that is rated for fiberglass, it's holding up really well. Same glue I used for the roof rafters. The sides are just held in with the window frames.

 

I did replace the trim, I used 3/4" as well. I ordered it off amazon. Installation tip, do it when it's hot out. I tried when it was cold and I about wrecked my fingers, once it warmed up it was pretty easy. As for the screws I had the same problem, probably half of them were rusted and stripped out. I just left em, hit em with silicone and moved on with life. I also painted a layer of polyester resin along the inside at the screw joint, as well as grinded down any screws poking through.

 

Glad to hear you passed your inspection and can hopefully get on the road soon. I have resorted to building a temporary setup so I can begin to use it for work through the summer, which will give me time to plan and think through all the final versions of what I'm going to build and how to install all the systems back in. For now it's nice being able to stand up, have lights on a switch and real ceiling fans for airflow.

 

20200517_161325.jpg

 

20200527_180138.jpg

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On 1/21/2020 at 10:55 PM, Ctgriffi said:

Just a friendly suggestion: I’ve done a lot of peel-n-stick floors, with many good results, but I would never do it again for an RV: wide temp changes cause that stuff to lift, buckle, and spread apart. Vinyl sheet or click-lock plank would be my preference, in hindsight. 

I whole hardheartedly agree with this...

Peel and stick in something flexible just tears itself apart..

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I used peel and stick flooring in our 1991 Itasca about 5 years ago and haven't had any trouble with it yet. The average temperature inside the RV stays around 120 degrees when parked at home in San Antonio during the summer. We travel around a lot but never go up North during the winter.

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