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Utah-Clay

I am now a Toyota Motorhome owner

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Hi, longtime lurker, first time poster. I just bought a very clean 92 Horizon-ST, 65k miles, solid but with a few cosmetic needs. Unfortunately no manuals and I have found very little info about these models. I am a long time Rv-er, just finished a 9 month tour towing a trailer. I would like to know about the components and any issues. I am sure I will figure it out by reverse engineering and poking around but if anyone has this model i would appreciate an assist.

In the short term I will need to reline the shower as the "vinyl" is de-laminating and some personal tweaking. Longer term will be solar, external storage, and a complete window and roof reseal.

Really looking forward to camping in this little beast and being part of the community!

 

Clay

 

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Never mind on the manuals, found the secret stash for all of the appliances. I would like to find a cop of the chassis owners manual if there is one online?

Playing with the new Toy, I pumped up the air shocks (not bags), no change in height. Let out all the air. No change in height, that is not the way it supposed to be is it?

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Your not supposed to have air shocks. I'm not surprised there's no difference in height. They just don't have enough oomph to support the weight of a full sized motorhome

Linda S

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Or replace with  Bilstein shocks!

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30 minutes ago, markwilliam1 said:

Or replace with  Bilstein shocks!

And some airbags! I may need some OME springs as well, it is a bit saggy.

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On 5/2/2019 at 6:03 PM, jjrbus said:

Dump the air shocks and put in air bags!

https://ether3al.com/93fsm-mobile/

 

Yotatech.com is also a gold mine for truck info.

Hite Rite system is ordered and on thway along with replacement KYB shocks. Thanks for the tech link!

 

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Yeah you had better tell us what you ordered. Link? Hate to have you get the wrong thing

Linda S

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17 hours ago, Derek up North said:

I'm not sure if 'Hite-Rite' will help much! :)

Hite_Rite_Ad_from_Fat_Tire_Flyer_Vol_5_N

Damn my mountain bike age is showing. Not sure where that came from. Air-Lift with compressor, dual side controller. Is that better?

When I first saw a modern dropper post, I flashed back and thought, what's next, oval chainrings? Yep.

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https---www.airliftcompany.com-shop-57113-.url

I've been looking at these airlift.  My Warrior has the 3T's T9 airlift bags but one side won't stay up.  How much vertical motion do these 57113's allow?  The airlift page doesn't say.

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Thanks, Derek.

I don't think the difference in weight of lift matters.  I've had that Warrior plenty loaded and the 3Ts 2000 lbs has been sufficient.  Airlifts are less costly and that always matters.  I am just not sure that the airlifts allow as much up and down axle movement on some of the pothole pounding roads I sometimes have to use.

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12 hours ago, BobBeery said:

I am just not sure that the airlifts allow as much up and down axle movement on some of the pothole pounding roads I sometimes have to use.

Airlift and Firestone both have compressor kits that can be operated from the cab. They include gauges so that you can keep track of what pressures you like best. 

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Yeah, pressure is what determines the amount of up/down the bags will allow—30psi is the lowest you should go with the AirLift setup, but most of us use around 50-60, I believe.

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CAUTION air bags are a small volume of air and are easy to over inflate, tread carefully. There is no correct pressure for air bags.  Most are 20 psi minimum and 90 psi maximum. Less than 20 psi can damage most bags, there are bags that have stops. I would guess over 90 will blow them up.  I have not experimented with that yet.  The one thing they do well is isolate the cabin from vibrations. so less psi is better.   
 The purpose of the bags is to level the RV front to rear and side to side. The psi will vary depending on the condition of the suspension and weight distribution.  It is not uncommon for one bag to have more or less air than the other one.  Mine are about 10 psi different.  A rule of thumb is when the headlights are aimed properly it is the correct pressure.  Caution must be exercised when filling bags as they are small and can be over pressurized quickly!  
 I do add air to my bags when leaving blacktop for more clearance and also use them at times to level coach when parked. Most find 50 psi is a good starting point to make adjustments.
 I found a lot of misinformation on bags so made a copy and paste, which I add to when needed.

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Though I see no point in exploring the 'extremes' of air spring pressures, there are other max/mins.

The basics are that if you've only got 5psi. the springs are basically adding no support, so pointless to chose it. 100psi? You'll have  hard time finding a pump at a gas station that's set to give that. I suspect to protect consumers from themselves by inflating their tires that high and having a blowout. (Nanny State & lawyers!) :)

3T - 20-100psi.jpg

5psi.jpg

Ride-Rite 100psi max.jpg

Ride-Rite Air Pressure 2-3psi.jpg

AirLift 5-100psi.jpg

Ride Rite.pdf Airlift 57113 MN-214.pdf

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I installed the AirLift system with a compressor and two gauges and individual control. The lines have a built in sensor that will fire up the compressor if the lines go below 5psi. It really helped out with bottoming and feels much more composed. I have a sway bar and with the bags a recent drive in strong winds the little guy hardly noticed and maintained composure even with strong side winds.

Next suspension project is to crank the front end up a little bit. It appears that there are Bilstien's on the front, at least some yellow shocks. If not then KYB's on the way.

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How are the bushings in the rear leaf springs?  Mine are shot.  I just bought new bushings but still have to get them in.  I expect them to really improve sway and vibration.  Will see.

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3 hours ago, BobBeery said:

How are the bushings in the rear leaf springs?  Mine are shot.  I just bought new bushings but still have to get them in.  I expect them to really improve sway and vibration.  Will see.

My bushings were in good shape but it is easy to see how wear would make things wobbly.

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On 5/20/2019 at 12:35 PM, Utah-Clay said:

Next suspension project is to crank the front end up a little bit.

If your torsion bars are working properly and not worn out then you can crank them up to get a bit of lift.  One of my torsion arms was worn out and I had to replace them both.  The amount of lift you can get will be limited by the bumpers and the amount of control arm travel you want.  You start running into problems with anything over about 0.75" above stock height (see FSM for how to measure reference front end ride height).  You also run into limitations with alignment, although with a '92 you may have the cam type adjustment instead of the shims that I have on my IFS '87 front end.  On my rig the ability to align while maintaining decent control arm travel was enough of an issue that I went with a ball joint spacer to compensate.  See this post about how I used a ball joint spacer to get 1" of front lift:

 

On 5/20/2019 at 12:35 PM, Utah-Clay said:

I installed the AirLift system with a compressor and two gauges and individual control.

This is the same kind of set up I'm using (Ride-Rites, not AirLift, but same functionality) and I'm running about 35 PSI in each bag and I can change it on the fly to compensate for changing road conditions and to level the rig.

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Utah-Clay, do you have the Airlift part number for that compressor-gauge set?  The airlift website gives 10 choices for Toyota micro-mini but none shown have two gauges, although one choice shown has two needles in one gauge.

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4 hours ago, BobBeery said:

Utah-Clay, do you have the Airlift part number for that compressor-gauge set?  The airlift website gives 10 choices for Toyota micro-mini but none shown have two gauges, although one choice shown has two needles in one gauge.

This one- it was $50 cheaper last month.

Air Lift 57113/25812 Set of Rear Load Lifter 5000 Series w/Load Controller II On-Board Air Compressor System Kit for 86-94 Toyota Motorhome Micro Mini

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07F2JW2P6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_80l7Cb933C0PA

Wasn't too hard to install BUT I have a very slow leak on the passenger side in wed to track down. 

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On 5/26/2019 at 7:47 AM, AtlantaCamper said:

If your torsion bars are working properly and not worn out then you can crank them up to get a bit of lift.  One of my torsion arms was worn out and I had to replace them both.  The amount of lift you can get will be limited by the bumpers and the amount of control arm travel you want.  You start running into problems with anything over about 0.75" above stock height (see FSM for how to measure reference front end ride height).  You also run into limitations with alignment, although with a '92 you may have the cam type adjustment instead of the shims that I have on my IFS '87 front end.  On my rig the ability to align while maintaining decent control arm travel was enough of an issue that I went with a ball joint spacer to compensate.  See this post about how I used a ball joint spacer to get 1" of front lift:

 

This is the same kind of set up I'm using (Ride-Rites, not AirLift, but same functionality) and I'm running about 35 PSI in each bag and I can change it on the fly to compensate for changing road conditions and to level the rig.

I was told by mechanic that I need new torsion bars on my 1987 Escaper. Took care of the leaf springs, cannot find what size or where to get replacement torsion bars. Any suggestions? Thank you

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The link Linda sent for the "Torsion Bar Set – 84-95 Toyota Pickup 2WD" is what I bought and I'm very pleased with them.  $222.88 shipped.  The website will say 'backordered' but if you call on the phone they will manually check the warehouse and likely find a pair.  The lady on the phone said that the online database isn't linked to the actual reality in the warehouse.   I received mine in less than a week.  They were pretty easy to put in.  

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Thank you AC and Linda. Also WME lol 👍🏼

Edited by Sandune24
Left out WME in response

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12 hours ago, Sandune24 said:

I was told by mechanic that I need new torsion bars on my 1987 Escaper.

Before you buy new ones, did your mechanic mention trying to adjust your existing ones?

 

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