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LittleShack

Driving in the snow??

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Can anyone tell me how these RVs handle in the snow? I am trying to avoid this, but in case I am stuck, how do the duallys handle the snow? I have lots of snow driving experience in trucks and cars, but the RV is a whole other beast. Are chains a good idea? All season tires? Thanks!-Sue

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Well I had a dually Dodge it was about as useless as it gets in the snow even with a limited slip diff. Now it did not have a house on it's back for weight but I'm guessing the front wheels on a toy home may have a tendency to lookup mine stayed in the barn till May! 

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I live in the mountains in WY, if you don't go in the winter you don't do much for 5 months a year.

With decent all season tires they do pretty good in snow. Rear weight basis ya know. I have driven over South Pass several times in the winter with my Toy, even pulling a trailer. The magic is a SMART CAREFUL DRIVER going slowly. Unless you're going off the road, over a cliff or into a 4ft high snowdrift, don't ever stop, even if the rears are spinning.

Chains are a last resort. If its really that bad stay home

Also on my toy the brake basis was set FULL to the rear 

Now on real ice fergetaboutit. Also, a limited slip on ice is bad juju, with both tires spinning and a little road camber the rear will slide off to the low side. With an open differential you may not be able to go, but on an iced up off-camber road the tire that isn't spinning will give you some side bite and that maybe thats enough to keep you on the road. On dry pavement and an overabundance of HP a limited slip is a true wonder.

Edited by WME

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I've driven my Sunrader a few times in light snow. It handled pretty well. Same rules as anything your driving but more so. No sudden moves, give cars in front of you lots of room so you can stop in time if they hit the brakes. Pump brakes and controlled use of emergency brake can help you stay straight on the road if you start to swerve. The biggy, slow. Don't even try to stay up with traffic. 

Linda S

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Thanks everyone!

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So a bit of weather chased me into Weed early in the afternoon of Jan 5. Got 6-8 inches before it got cold and had to hunker down. Spent the night at the Pilot Travel Center in Weed. There was a break in the weather so I followed the trucks as they started south just before sun-up. Roads were a snowy mess. RV felt stable and well behaved. Used engine breaking and maintained my distance. I followed the truck ahead of me and just stayed in his wheel tracks. Took 4 hours to make the 128 miles to Redding. I do not think I would do that again. But that being said, with care you could drive to a safe place to wait it out. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by 1988dolphin

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