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Does anyone know how to change trans fluid in a A43D transmission, and fluid amounts less torque converter, fluid type and how to add the fluid?

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7 minutes ago, sonny sunrader said:

Does anyone know how to change trans fluid in a A43D transmission, and fluid amounts less torque converter, fluid type and how to add the fluid?

About 4 qts syn type atf and a funnel with a very small end the fill tube is where the dip stick is and it's not much bigger than a 1/2". There is a drain plug on the bottom of the transmission pan.

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What about filter, is there one, and if so how do you change it?

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It's just a little mesh screen. You have to remove the pan to get to it. Messy pain to do and mine was original and didn't look gummed up at all. I wouldn't bother unless black clods come out of the drain and you need to really clean the pan

Linda S

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Depending on how many miles you have on the tranny and how long since your last fluid change you might consider having a transmission shop familiar with Toys due a compete flush and fill. Draining and adding fluid yourself does Not flush the tranny completely clean. It takes a lot of fluid to do that properly. Drain & refill drain & refill etc. I just had my tranny flushed (they used 10 quarts to completely flush the tranny,) filter cleaned, new gasket and a magnet to clean up any debris. They can also adjust your tranny if needed to make it shift properly. They use dextron 4 now which is full synthetic. Not cheap but I won't need to do it again for 20-30K miles. Just my 2 cents!

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Draining the pan will get 2-3 qts. My drill was once a year to do that and add fresh fluid. That way the trannie will always have additives.

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Ok I think I have the info I need, Thanks to everyone for all the help! Sonny Sunrader

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22 hours ago, sonny sunrader said:

What about filter, is there one, and if so how do you change it?

The filter is plastic and really is not much more that a screen door they generally are just cleaned unlike a fiber filter that would be replaced. There is a problem you might run into removing the pan you probably will snap off a bolt or two just warning you in advance so if you don't have to remove it don't.

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Someone mentioned "flush" - I would say AWAY from that!   Flushing can break loose old gum deposits that can migrate into any of many little orifices - resulting in complete teardown / rebuild.

Standard service is to remove pan, change screen (clean magnets if any are in there - they catch metal filings), replace and refill lost fluid.  NOTE: most fluid in in lines, cooler etc so a std service only changes a few quarts of fluid. 

I did a standard when I got mine - now I use the drain plug to replace the few quarts that will drain out about every 10000 miles

--------------Another option is to remove a cooler line, run the engine and let the tranny pump the ATF out - and replace it at the same rate.  Never tried it myself. 

 

----------------This is what I use for ATF - it is dexron II compatible - over 50000 miles without issues.....    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Castrol-Transmax-DEX-MERC-Automatic-Transmission-Fluid-1-Gal-Bottle/17253576   and a very good price too!

 

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I personally think the flushing process is important because it removes any contaminated old fluid in the tranny, cleans the screen, removes metal shavings, new pan gasket and also replaces all the old dextron 2 fluid with the new full synthetic dextron 4. I think the odds are pretty slim that flushing your tranny would result in a complete breakdown resulting in a rebuild. 

Edited by markwilliam1
More info.

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I disconnected the cooler line and ran the engine while dumping in fresh fluid at the same time.  The fluid was changed just before I bought the RV 6 years ago and was still nice and clean.  The old fluid did not smell any different than the new fluid.  After my 7500 mile trip last year and only 3000 this year I will probably wait until spring to do it again.  I can do it myself pretty cheaply.  I am probably going to drop in a larger radiator next spring also.

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High mileage flush should be avoided if it has not been done on a regular basis. The gook on the clutch plates with age actually protects them the fluid is highly detergent and removes the built up goo and soon the friction surfaces take it on the chin and you are reduced to walking. If the fluid has been changed regularly that is not an issue, 30K for a complete flush will help the trans to last  longer. Many years ago long before they made flush machines we made a double ended cylinder with a piston. The new fluid was placed in the chamber that was at the bottom (it held about 6qts) the old fluid under pressure forced the piston up and pushed the new fluid into the return line. To repeat the process air pressure pushed the cylinder back down dumped the old fluid from the bottom and new fluid was added to the top. Crude but it worked.

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You’ve been around for awhile Maineah Lol! I agree about high mileage tranny flush. Since Grannie has such low mileage I’m going to have a complete flush every 25K. Thanks for your input!

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Every 25,000 miles would be way more than could ever be necessary unless you were deliberately cooking your fluid. If it ain't broke don't fix it.

Linda S

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Just going by what the Transmission supervisor stated. I’m going to follow his expert advice since I shift a lot and the tranny is already stressed. Don’t put your that many miles on her so it won’t be that often.

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'Transmission Supervisor'? I'll bet he's working on commission to suggest using full synthetic and changing it with a full flush every 20k miles. If it won't even go 30k miles with 'regular' ATF as recommended by Toyota for Severe Service, what's the point of using 'full synthetic? :) 

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Point taken Derek. Thanks for the severe service recommendation! Will do @ 30K if I live that long hopefully, 

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5 hours ago, linda s said:

Every 25,000 miles would be way more than could ever be necessary unless you were deliberately cooking your fluid. If it ain't broke don't fix it.

Linda S

Unfortunately these things were never designed to handle the stress 6000# puts on them they cook fluid even though you try your best not to allow that it's cheap insurance. The average toy home owners yearly mileage is probably less than 3 grand a year so every 10 years you do a full flush? Those that drive more will benefit from fluid changes. When I bought my Nova Star it had 28K on it that worked out to like 1,700 miles a year the fluid was brown never changed 30 K later I changed it again it was much cleaner but needed it. I did around 6K a year.

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On 10/2/2017 at 10:50 AM, markwilliam1 said:

I personally think the flushing process is important because it removes any contaminated old fluid in the tranny, cleans the screen, removes metal shavings, new pan gasket and also replaces all the old dextron 2 fluid with the new full synthetic dextron 4. I think the odds are pretty slim that flushing your tranny would result in a complete breakdown resulting in a rebuild. 

it might "remove" most of the gunk, but it only takes a very small amount to clog some of the orifices in the control mechanism......

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On 10/2/2017 at 10:50 AM, markwilliam1 said:

I personally think the flushing process is important because it removes any contaminated old fluid in the tranny, cleans the screen, removes metal shavings, new pan gasket and also replaces all the old dextron 2 fluid with the new full synthetic dextron 4. I think the odds are pretty slim that flushing your tranny would result in a complete breakdown resulting in a rebuild. 

When you run the engine to purge the fluid the old fluid is drawn through the filter hence the stuff that might be floating around is now stuck to the filter the metal bits are still laying in the bottom of the pan yes the old fluid is gone but that's about it. Removing the pan will give you about 4 qts that leaves you  about 5 qts still in the system in many cases of high millage  that is a good thing. I can not begin to tell you how many times I have seen trans failure on high mileage vehicles not just Toyotas when they were drained. If the fluid was brown or smelled burnt within about a week they quit moving. We saved clean drained fluid from low mileage vehicles to put in high mileage vehicles of those that insisted on replacing the fluid not a flush just draining the pan because all though we told them not a good ideal they still insisted we drain it. The Toyota trans is an all clutch trans it has no bands, the clutch drums are an excellent place to hide crud new fluid has a tendency to loosen that stuff. Granted it's been many years since I was a shop manager but at that time the OD Toyota trans was in pretty much anything Toyota, yes they are tough transmissions but still required the same care as the rest of them.

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FWIW personal experience. When I bought my Escaper the transmission fluid looked like Mocha. I did the fluid transfer cylinder setup at the local NON chain transmission shop it took 16 qts to get a good flush. Cleaned the pan and the filter

No problems for the next 40,000 mi when I sold it.

Edited by WME

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5 hours ago, WME said:

FWIW personal experience. When I bought my Escaper the transmission fluid looked like Mocha. I did the fluid transfer cylinder setup at the local NON chain transmission shop it took 16 qts to get a good flush. Cleaned the pan and the filter

No problems for the next 40,000 mi when I sold it.

Mine had 28K when I bought it same deal when I changed it again in about 25K it was still red. A lot of the issues occur in urban use out in the hinterlands the demands on the transmission are a lot less. You are right an independent shop is the place to take it preferably an ATRA shop.

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You are right an independent shop is the place to take it preferably an ATRA shop............................I agree, donnie

 

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ATRA shops are nationwide at least when I was still in the game any ATRA shop would repair/replace a trans from another ATRA shop they were not beholding to corporate. They would charge the other shop but no cost to the owner of the vehicle.

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Yep my shop is independent and family owned. Used 16 qts for a complete flush. Grannie is happy!

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Markwilliam,      I happened to notice your location..........   Did you have you work done at Jim Currier' s  Shop...if so....you made an excellent  choice.. They are great  folks.              .......donnie

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Possibly Donnie it was Jim & Sons on Front St. in the Falls.

Edited by markwilliam1
More info

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Hi - I have a 1985 Sunrader which has 47 k on it (recently bought). Has auto trans. with od. I plan to put a transmission cooler on it and drain/refill it with Dexron 111. I assume it has Dexron 11 now. It works perfectly now but will be taken on a trip over the Cascades and Rockies soon and we want to be sure it runs cool enough (hardly ever use the od).  Any thoughts appreciated.

 

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1 hour ago, greg Linder said:

Hi - I have a 1985 Sunrader which has 47 k on it (recently bought). Has auto trans. with od. I plan to put a transmission cooler on it and drain/refill it with Dexron 111. I assume it has Dexron 11 now. It works perfectly now but will be taken on a trip over the Cascades and Rockies soon and we want to be sure it runs cool enough (hardly ever use the od).  Any thoughts appreciated.

 

Yes on cooler, put it in series with the radiator cooler. Aftermarket first then radiator. This will help take some of the heat out of the radiator when your making a long up hill climb.

Yes on Dex 3. Draining the pan will only remove 2-3 qts. But that much fresh fluid will be a big help. The transmission filter is just a big piece screen not worth changing unless its torn.

Yes on hardly use O/D To be totally sure of things add a trannie temp gauge

Edited by WME

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A flat plate cooler is more $$ but it is more efficient than a tube and fin cooler. Both of these coolers are 18,000lb units. You can see the size difference and cost. Your choice
This is a flat plate cooler...https://www.jegs.com/i/JEGS/555/60380/10002/-1

This is a tube and fin cooler...https://www.jegs.com/i/TCI/890/820500/10002/-1

 

 

 

 

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On 9/5/2019 at 1:57 PM, greg Linder said:

plan to put a transmission cooler

Does your model already have a transmission cooler in front of the radiator?  In my 87/88 Sunrader I have one already installed and it's all I need to keep the transmission cool on hills.  Does your radiator have the inlet/outlet for the transmission fluid?  Mine flows through this and then trough a trans cooler.  I installed a simple mechanical temp gauge in the line that runs from the trans to the radiator to monitor the trans.

If you don't see any metal shavings come out I find the easiest way to do a fluid swap is the the sequential drain and replace method - only about 2 of the 8 or 9 quarts in there will come out with the plug out.  You have to do this in multiple steps with driving in between to mix the fluid.  No need to crack the pan gasket at 47k unless you see crud.  Even with the pan off there is still a _lot_ of fluid retained in the torque converter and so I don't think there is such a thing as a one-step fluid change in these transmissions.  If you are changing from one fluid type to another this can be an issue I suppose because they need to be compatible.

Oh yea, and forget about the overdrive on anything but downhill with a tailwind.  4k RPM in 1st or second up steep hills is how I do it.

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