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Temporarily hung up the kitchen cabinet base, and the set down the fridge base cabinet, raised as much as I could without losing the access vent. 5 inches from floor. But it does give me a few square feet in the aisle that were going waste because the fridge previously would extend farther out with a ton of wasted space all around. There should be space for a small drawer and routing of propane and cabling underneath. Need to size this cabinet configurably so I can reconfigure the fridge space after using it a bit. And then above the fridge and around the dually tires.

Conquest comes with an L bracket on top of the passanger side dually tires. Attached with bolts through the OSB to the frame and the other end of the L with six screws holding the wall. Looks structural. It eats up a lot of useful space and makes organising this space a royal pain. There is probably 2/3 cubic feet lost there and it makes improving the protection of the thin plastic dually fender/tire well damn near impossible.

Still, this is some kind of progress. If only 4 screws worth. Lets see what the fridge side configuration looks like eventually.

20171119_192416.jpg

Edited by neubie

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when you buy carpet or vinyl for your truck, specify either extended cab or motorhome clearly. Otherwise you will not get it long enough in one direction. They also skip on the length of the jute underlayment/backing. It invariably never extends to the back of the cab. Lastly, let the vinyl sit for a good long while unfurled and flat. Only then make any cuts.

Having said all this, a good vinyl floor is absolutely the way to go in the truck.

Have been making stick jenga figures for kitchen and fridge cabinetry. Along some way, good long way to go. After this, bathroom cabinetry. That would finish major woodworking. Hopefully in the next two weeks the space will resemble a motorhome again.

I am thinking of doing a round table instead of the stock square 2x2. For some reason the damn hole in the floor doesnt hold the table as upright as I would expect. Its trivial to get it to go south any which way. Doesnt topple over but leans enough to throw anything sitting on it. Perhaps the ends of the pole are bent out of shape from being used as a tire iron. Either way, some new arrangement is needed at the table. I would also love to just do with the hole in the floor and not the screwed on protrusion that goes on the pole at the floor level. Just from a dissassemble flat perspective.

Tons still to do. Truck wants the carpet in, then all the ugliness behind the seats -- the space between seats and coach to be redone.

Very slow progress.

 

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I made a door. That is to say I cut a 3/4 inch piece of plywood into the irregular hole that is the entrance to the loo and hung it there on two hinges. This took days. Because doors expect rectangular holes to go into, the entryway isnt. And the floor while generally acceptably flat isnt flat enough to open a door on. In the end where I wanted little or no space between the frame and the door, there is a good 1/8th in. Because 3/4 ply is hardly easy to cut through with a multitool when hung as a door.

It will need door-ification, a strengthened door frame, door hardware, and the door itself wants a frame to not look like a piece of ply.

Its on there and swinging. Now I just need to finish hanging the rest of the cupboards and then get back to beautification. Mainly, the fridge vent.

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Only bathroom cabinet framing is left. It is tricky because I am rerouting the abs to the black vent, and there was no sink there so its almost a new vanity. The back closet -- this is a rear bath configuration -- is done so if I can finish the framing in the shared wall then only plywood installation will remain.

The kitchen cabinet on one side is framed. The kitchen counter only needs holes cut for sink, faucet, oven. The fridge cabinet is framed. The fridge vent is sort of framed. Needs fridge dimensions to be fixed first.  So bath vanity/cabinet, and a decision on the cabinet over the fridge vent remain.

Still hoping to finish the carpentry this month. Cleanup and water/gas connections now looking like next month tasks. But that is all that remains now.  Putting things in and finishing up. Every section has its todo list just as long as it ever was, but now it deals with new/clean stuff. Hopefully, cabinets are at least framed this week. There is not that many sticks to cut!

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There was some rain, on my parade.  Front window still leaks on driver side. Fortunately, I was prepared for the poor workmanship of my repair ( havent taken it off and resealed it), so the aluminium is still bare in the cabover for access. Still sucks to be chasing leaks.

Otherwise, what little working time there is, gets spent carpenting. Still days to go in framing and cutting.

 

ps: battery warranties need original receipt.

Edited by neubie

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The optima keeps dropping to 11.something volts after a fast charger says its done charging. Trying desulphation but likely just wants replacement now.

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Sounds like a replacement is next in line.

  • Looks like you have a shorted cell. 2v + 11v =13v which is a resting battery

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1 hour ago, WME said:

Sounds like a replacement is next in line.

  • Looks like you have a shorted cell. 2v + 11v =13v which is a resting battery

coming to that conclusion slowly as well. Overall investigation: 1 harbor freight trickler, 1 black and decker trickler, 1 noco genius trickler, a schumacher 15amp charger, and the convertor charger of the toy.

Battery goes to 12++ then rests in the 11s. May be desulphation will move it a tad so it can remain useful even if its not a starting battery anymore.

I am leaning towards a LiPo starter in coach (for heat management reasons) getting rid of a traditional starting battery. Any reason not to? The truck draws less that 600cca as far as i can tell (have not looked up any numbers). There is existing wiring, just move the isolator along with battery inside to the power center in coach.  No way for anyone to run away with the truck if they dont know what switches to turn on to send power to the truck. Well, short of jumping it anyway.

 

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le Optima is done for. I will try a couple drain/recharge cycles and then give in and recycle.Cant do anything to get it to budge from 11s.

My sticks are all in place. Need to cut some ply, and the various holes for pipes and cables. If I can get this done tomorrow it will be a rare planned event (serious carpentry over in november).

The vinyl flooring for truck has been laid out mostly unfurled for a while. Any special recommendations on how to stick it on?

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Lipo are a very energy dense battery and can do wonderful things. BUT they have a strange charge/discharge realm. Make sure you have the proper charger and battery manager

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Be very careful of any lithium battery there are prone to thermal runaway remember hover board fires and flaming laptops? The size does not matter it's the chemistry. Can't remember the aircraft number but they were grounded for battery fires. They have to be extremely well voltage /current regulated not something you would find in a vehicle.

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On 11/30/2017 at 6:54 AM, Maineah said:

Be very careful of any lithium battery there are prone to thermal runaway remember hover board fires and flaming laptops? The size does not matter it's the chemistry. Can't remember the aircraft number but they were grounded for battery fires. They have to be extremely well voltage /current regulated not something you would find in a vehicle.

Its the 787 that had famous battery fires. But they have also had issues on airbuses.

I can get away with a smaller battery with lithium and the hope is that enough has trickled down from tesla and toyota and the other hybrid/electrics by now to get a decent battery if one is not overly cost conscious. I have used lithium jump starters exclusively for some time and those have held up to abuse. They claim upward of 20AH in them these days. Given battery efficiency and all the other factors/differences, two of those can probably hold up against an optima yellowtop agm. The only challenge with those is that they want to be slow charged, so I want to buy something similar but with 12v charging.

There are stories on the net of folks off-griding with huge lithium banks. So this isnt a crazy idea, I just dont know the brand/model that fits the little truck yet.

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My major major challenge in the coach is fitting the bath sink, faucet and routing the abs around all the new obstructions. It was a straight pipe before. Now, thats where the sink goes. When that is done, all parts would have been at least cut to fit. Screwing, priming, painting of cupboards and finishing will remain.

 

Anyone put down vinyl in the truck cabin? Need to get a diploma there before I start cutting it. Spent a good deal of time taking off the carpet earlier. The floor is basically cheese because of all those screw holes. Cant imagine why so many were needed. I am not using any screws or adhesive this time. the vinyl will sit on sound damping foam and under the trim where there is trim. Only holes will be for seats/belts. No point in having vinyl if its still going to let water in below it from top. I doubt its going anywhere given its large size and thickness.

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I did a 1 piece vinyl floor in my Escaper. Removed the carpet and a zillion staples. Started with a cardboard cut, fit, tape, floor pattern. I transferred it to a 2 piece floor overlayment of birch floor panels ( they were 7 ply instead of the 3 plywood normally used). Screwed it and glued it to a clean original floor. I used water putty to fill the screw dents, then sanded everything smooth. Any imperfection in the floor will come through the vinyl in time

I glued the vinyl in the middle so that it could float at the edges when the temperature changed. I left a gap at the edges and used 1/4 round to trim the edges. The result was easy to clean and mostly water proof. But it was cold in the mornings so I added a carpet runner. Just take it out and give it an old fashion broom bashing every so often

Edited by WME

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58 minutes ago, WME said:

I did a 1 piece vinyl floor in my Escaper. Removed the carpet and a zillion staples. Started with a cardboard cut, fit, tape, floor pattern. I transferred it to a 2 piece floor overlayment of birch floor panels ( they were 7 ply instead of the 3 plywood normally used). Screwed it and glued it to a clean original floor. I used water putty to fill the screw dents, then sanded everything smooth. Any imperfection in the floor will come through the vinyl in time

I glued the vinyl in the middle so that it could float at the edges when the temperature changed. I left a gap at the edges and used 1/4 round to trim the edges. The result was easy to clean and mostly water proof. But it was cold in the mornings so I added a carpet runner. Just take it out and give it an old fashion broom bashing every so often

The floor wasnt going to be flat with just sanding, its three separate OSB planks and the edge of one by the entry was warped enough that it would have needed quite a bit of cutting and then Dap leveler or something to stand a chance with sheet vinyl.

 

I was not ready to open/reseal the OSB so just did minor sanding and kilz before flooring. There is 2mm foam protecting the OSB so changes are easy in the future. I did planks on the coach, and tiles in the bath with enough spare to permit dissection and surgery.

What about the truck? That is where I have to finish still. Its one hunking piece of vinyl. Its been unwrapped for a few days. Obviously it needs at least two cuts for the seats and several screw holes for each seat/seat belt. They ship it about a foot wider on each side, so its not easiest to work with. I dont have a YouTube diploma yet so am looking for pointers there.

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I used a after market carpet kit for the front. I cut to fit a layer of Reflectix for the under side and layer an extra layer over the transmission tunnel and the catalytic converter. Then came the carpet. The reflectix made a large difference in heat on the floor.

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7 hours ago, WME said:

I used a after market carpet kit for the front. I cut to fit a layer of Reflectix for the under side and layer an extra layer over the transmission tunnel and the catalytic converter. Then came the carpet. The reflectix made a large difference in heat on the floor.

Thats very interesting. Does one allow a heat dissipating path by underinsulating over the transmission or cut down on heat and noise by over insulating the hump? Various facebook and youtube postings claim to want to "ventilate the transmission hump for the hard working transmission". Never understood the merits of doing it from inside the truck.

I get the idea re. exhaust. Especially since the exhaust had caused three holes in the cab at some time.

As of now, first will be ample sound insulation. There is an existing glued layer, I will add a second. Then some reflectix attached to vinyl as backing. I am holding on to the jute layer until dry environment is assured and verified. Then vinyl on top.

How high does the vinyl go up the firewall? Do you unscrew the center console attachment  and install under it or just work around it?

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Never mind the theoretical stuff from the net. 2 layers of reflectix is cheap and works well.  Full blown heat proofing can be done but its $$$

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Its been a bit too cold and windy of late. Windy more the trouble than cold. Still hoping to get the vinyl in place this week.

Roughed up the holes for the oven, both sinks, and the black abs to the vent. That took a lot of courage given my non existent abilities and utter lack of experience.  Still the bathroom is mostly roughed up now. Waiting its turn to be primered, abs cemented etc. The vanity will stick out a few inches farther than I would like but it should work out.

Tons of little stuff, all water, propane, and appliance hookup. No end in sight yet.

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On 12/3/2017 at 2:49 PM, WME said:

Never mind the theoretical stuff from the net. 2 layers of reflectix is cheap and works well.  Full blown heat proofing can be done but its $$$

Got as far as putting down reflectix on top of sound deadner and then realised that holes for seats/belts need to be located through to next layer. Hadnt seen the bolts in months. Wasnt event sure I will find them. After going through approximately 1 million and four nuts and bolts there they were in all their rusted glory. I am not doing anything fancy with seat frames or bolts at this point. They get a treatment of WD40 and back they go in. Hopefully I get a youtube certification in cutting/fitting the vinyl tonight and actually put it down tomorrow.

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boy, howdy. they make it seem like its 5 minute job.

 

 

 

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Something to think about. I'm 5'9" tall and it always seemed to me that I was looking through a pillbox gun slit when I drove my rig. So I got some longer seat bolts and some short pipe nipples and cut them to make a 3/4" lift. Not a big lift but it seemed to help a bunch with the pillbox effect.

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7 hours ago, WME said:

Something to think about. I'm 5'9" tall and it always seemed to me that I was looking through a pillbox gun slit when I drove my rig. So I got some longer seat bolts and some short pipe nipples and cut them to make a 3/4" lift. Not a big lift but it seemed to help a bunch with the pillbox effect.

I am about the same. Sitting higher is always welcome but for the space constraints overhead. I am getting about 1/2" out of the mixture of things I am adding now over the floor. Hoping current screws will still work. Probably not enough, screws and height improvement both.  But will at least try first then modify given that there are so many many other things on the list.

The vinyl is cut and laid down. Its not an easy task with garden shears. I actually broke two pairs of general purpose scissors before it occured to me to use hedge repair tools. Its down, doesnt look terrible and seats are sitting on it. Not bolted. Still need to drill some holes.

In the process, found at least one more reason for water in the footwell. Numerous holes from erstwhile screws that secured the shag carpet. The screws went forever ago. But I never closed off those holes. Closed off most before I laid down sound deadner but still found more today that would have let water in. Sigh. Its a process. Some day it will all be done.

Edited by neubie

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i should take some pictures of el slate blanco while i have a chance.  its been a while since i felt like it. Its basically a whitewashed empty space. Totally white. Like every stick and its underside double white. There is a reason. Kilz was needed given there had been water and to at least cover over the 30 year history. Also if water comes in the future discoloration should be obvious. i want to catch it early. But if you paint every stick, nook and crevice, you use a lot of paint brushes and a lot of kilz. Over the floor, ceiling and walls front to back there is now at least 2.5 gallons of it. Hoping thats enough. I have had enough of primering. The bathroom door, the back side of the kitchen and wardrobe faces, etc had been hiding in plain sight. No more. Painting is time consuming, back breaking the way I do it, but not a mind consuming. I am procrastinating on putting the thing back together.

Hang doors, connect water and propane, and attach shower wallpaper and kitchen backsplash. May be a bit of counter top polish. Everything else upto floor level is finishing.  I need to start screwing appliances back in. But I dont seem to close it out. 

Tomorrow is entry step day. A new carlson-and-something single step and the one step inside itself is also getting a makeover. May be after that I will screw in some table legs and kitchen counter and stuff.

Edited by neubie

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