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zero

Toyota Advanced Member
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Everything posted by zero

  1. I think any of them are worth parting out if the price is right. Just keep in mind that motorhomes are hard to scrap. I've never come across a scrap-metal place that would take one unless you paid by the pound to get rid of it. Too much non-metal, water-soaked parts. I know a guy that goes around charging to scrap RVs and he gets around $500 to take one from your property and "dispose" of it. He takes them home. Strips them, and then pours kerosene all over and burns them up. Then loads what is left on a trailer and then the scrap-yard actually pays a little for it. NOT much. I just scrapped a 4 ton RV last week and got a whopping $72 for it. Scrap metal prices are awful right now. I just bought a 1978 high-roof Toyota motorhome for $200. I have no idea what it is. I do know it is NOT a Dolphin. Has a style I have never seen before. I was riding around in one the older parts of a local junkyard and saw it in the bushes. Has hornet nests in it so I did not get real close. The guy who owns the junkyard says he never buys foreign "junk" but this one was driven into his place and given to him for free. So he parked it in the woods maybe 20 years ago and never touched it since. I looked at a distance and see no rust. Seems just the truck part is worth $300 for the metal parts if clean. Whatever it is, it's mine. I just have to find time to go back there before winter with a load of tools and a lot of hornet spray.
  2. Here is a 1980 Dolphin and a 1979 EZ Ryder. There were others.
  3. zero

    Towing capacity

    Brakes should not be a "normal" issue if the trailer has its own brakes. I say "normal" since you don't want to die in a crash if the trailer-brakes fail. It almost happened to me pulling a 12K lb. trailer down a long hill with my diesel Ford F250. Lost my trailer-brakes and had to rely on the truck brakes and transmission holding me back. By the time I got to the bottom of the hill - brakes were glazed and non-functional. When I jammed the truck into low gear the rear tires just skidded. It was a 4WD but my front hubs were not locked. Otherwise I could of put it into 4WD and let the trans hold me back. Tongue-weight is what I regard as the major issue for a Toyota RV pulling a trailer - unless we are talking about a little Toyota Chinook. The Chinook allows a max of 150 lbs. on the tongue and a max of 1000 lbs. for a trailer.
  4. zero

    Towing capacity

    The pulling capacity of a 6 lug dually differential is no different then a 5 lug semi-floater.
  5. zero

    Towing capacity

    It's not just the static tongue weight. It's the forward "see-saw" bias when you hit a bump or surge of some sort. Several companies used to make little tongue dollies just for the this sort of use. E.g., a tow vehicle that cannot handle tongue weight. I wonder when there are no equipment trailers for highway use with zero tongue weight like done with farm trailers and hay-wagons. Or maybe there are, and I just haven't noticed.
  6. zero

    Towing capacity

    The reason why a 20-21 foot Toyota RV is not rated to pull anything is not because of the engine size. It is because of many factors that are already maxed out, e.g. transmission, brakes, rear-frame, etc. Regardless, many people have pulled small trailers and done fine. The original owner of my 1988 Minicruiser with a 22RE and auto trans pulled a 16' boat for many miles and years. Note though that I am in northern Michigan and the roads are all pretty much flat. I would NOT want to try it in hilly places. Trailer-tongue weight would be my biggest concern. A trailer-hitch on the rear of a 20-21 foot Toyota RV is so far back from the rear-axle - it has a dangerous amount of mechanical advantage to rock it and make it handle poorly if any substantial weight is on back.
  7. zero

    traction

    The FF has the same center-section at many other lighter trucks with semi-floating rears. No problem getting some sort of locker or "positive traction" type unit. Not something I'd ever want for driving in icy or snowy conditions. In my experience, they make driving worse in such conditions; not better. The nice thing about an open-differential is - when on ice or snow - the wheel with thebest traction does not spin and keeps you from sliding off the road sideways. Put a locker or clutched diff in there -and both wheels spins - and you slide like crazy. What WOULD be nice is some way to manually lock the rear only when needed. Like an electronic locker, or servo-hydraulic. Or - even two separate parking brake levers that can accomplish the same effect.
  8. zero

    Small inverter *&^%$#

    My on-board inverter is "on" all the time when driving or when camping. Never been an issue. The "stand-by" draw would take 10 days to run my batteries to 50% with no recharge. A non-issue with the way I do things. My main power-cord for the RV is plugged into the inverter. Subsequently, when "on" all our OEM AC outlets work. It's how we watch TV, run lap-top computers, fans, microwave, etc. My overheat fan has never come on under actual use. Just on the initial start-up sequence. It is supposed to come "on" for a few seconds just to let me know it's there and operational - and then it shuts off and stays off. I've got three inverters that get used a lot, with automatic cooling fans. A Harbor Freight 2000/4000 modified wave, a Ramson Sunray sinewave 1500/3000, and an AIMs sinewave 1500/3000. Some I have used pretty hard running big power tools. Never had a fan come on yet with any of them.
  9. zero

    Small inverter *&^%$#

    Yes, you are correct. That fan should never come on.
  10. zero

    Small inverter *&^%$#

    That 800 watt AIMs sounds defective to me. But - I have no idea what sort of load you are running. I also have no idea how much these things change, over time. I have four AIMs inverters. Two modified-wave, 1500 and 2000 watts. Also a 700 and a 2000 watt so-called "pure sine wave." All have thermally controlled fans and I've yet to ever have any of them come on when being used. That makes me wonder why your's comes on at all unless you are running that inverter at near max capacity. My guess is - it has a defective thermal switch. If it was mine, and was not under warranty, and not being used hard - I'd just cut the wires to the fan. I have experienced some other "odd" issues but figure I cannot blame it on AIMs. I have two "pure sine-wave" inverters that we use when camping or at our off-grid cabin. One is an AIMs 2000 and the other is a Ramsond Sunray 1500. With either - I discovered some oddities. One - if I try to use my cell-phone when using its AC converter for power - it is basically NOT usable since the screen-functions do not work. That is a Motorola Android Mini. Two - this one really seems ODD! I plugged in my Dell laptop via the AC power-supply and the mouse will not work. If I run the laptop off its own battery the mouse works fine. If I plug the same laptop into any of my cheap modified-wave inverters - it also works fine. Will NOT work with either of my "pure sine wave" inverters.
  11. zero

    traction

    I had to move my 1988 Minicruiser around my house last winter with 3"-4" of fresh snow. All flat here. It got much better traction then my Ford F250 (when in 2WD). I was surprised it does as good as it does. But I suspect anyone who owns a 4WD pickup knows how bad traction is in 2WD mode on snow or ice. I guess a Toyota RV is kind of like having a front-wheel drive going backwards. E.g. most of the weight is on the drive-axle. Or better yet - a BIG rear-engine, RWD VW Beetle from the 50s-60s.
  12. zero

    New owner here! 1981 Sunrader

    The actual load-carrying capacity of the axles and bearings is the same from the 1960s up through 2000s. No matter if 2WD or 4WD. What changed as far as weight-bearing capacity is when Toyota enlarged the housing-tubes from 2 1/2" to 3 1/8" OD. I don't remember exactly what year that happened but I think if was 1982 or 1983. The wheel bearings themselves and the diameter of the actual axles remained unchanged. The weight-bearing capacity is just one factor though when it comes to gross-axle-rating. Another is how much torque the ring & pinion can handle and that is determined by things like ring-gear size, or amount of differential-pinions, etc. That's why most V6s and turbo 4s have four-pinion rears instead of 2 pinion rears. I think it was around 2010 when Toyota finally increased the diameter of the axles and wheel bearings for the Tacoma and Tundra. Before that - a 1970 Toyota pickup has the same axle diameters as something like a 2006 V8 Tundra or Tacoma.
  13. zero

    D*mn Toyotas . . .

    So much for Popular "Science" magazine. They kind of goofed. Coachmen 6.2 liter diesel on an S10 chassis? No. S10 was indeed sold with a little Isuzu 2.2 diesel and was never used in that chassis-mount Coachmen.
  14. zero

    D*mn Toyotas . . .

    A few days ago someone told me that saw a real odd-looking Toyota motorhome for sale downstate from me. About a 270 mile trip. Then this morning - a little Toyota SUV came up for sale in the same area, on Craigs List. A Pontiac Vibe AWD (actually a Toyota Matrix). I called the seller. He was the original owner and swore it was in perfect running condition. Absolutely NOTHING wrong with it. So, we agreed on a price and I headed down there. I figured this way - I'd finally get my Matrix, and also get to see this "oddball" Toyota RV. Well? I got to the place where the Matrix/Vibe was for sale. I got in with the seller and started to drive it. It made an awful noise - like a bearing was badly burnt out in the front drive somewhere. He told me "it was fine" and he just had all new wheel bearings put into it. I would not trust it for a 5 mile trip - much less to drive it to where I live 135 miles away. I then saw the "check engine light" come on. He (the seller) that also was no problem and it has done that "for ages." I was pretty ticked off for making this trip when the guy told me it was in great mechanical shape. So, I left. I then swung over to where this mystical Toyota RV was supposed to be - and it was NOT there. Oddly - what I DID see - was a really neat 1982 Coachmen camper based on a Chevy 3/4 ton truck and a 6.2 litre diesel engine. The original owner just died and supposedly it has 7000 original miles on it. No way for me to know. 5 digit odometer it might be 107,000 miles or 207,000 miles. I will say the engine looks like new and is original which is rare for a 1982 diesel. First-year 1982 diesels had special problems that were fixed in 1983 and most have been replaced years ago. So who the heck knows? The person selling it for the dead guy wants $4000. I just dumped over a dozen 6.2 diesel trucks when I moved out of New York two years ago and not sure I want any more. But if the guy would sell for $2500 - I'd be very temped. He said he only drove it on one trip to try it out and it got 17 MPG. Not sure if I believe him. My Chevy Suburban with a 6.2 diesel and same TH400 auto trans got a best of 18 MPG. Kind of hard to believe that the same engine and trans in the Coachmen RV body does better. So,we got home tonight at 7 PM after driving mostly all day. I turn on my computer, check my email and guess what? I get a Craigs List alert about a Toyota mini RV that was just listed for sale in the place I just came back from. GEEZ ! It is a 1986 Toyota Bonanza Traveler. I wish I could of looked at it close. Price is too high for me but maybe it will go a lot cheaper? Last one I saw in that condition went for $1800.
  15. zero

    D*mn Toyotas . . .

    Kelly Blue Book is $2800 for private resale in "good condition." $1800 dealer trade-in. The seller originally wanted $3400 and then reluctantly agreed to $2800. That agreement was based on good condition and I could drive it home. If I had known it had issues - I'd gladly paid something like $2300 and put it on my trailer and trailered it home. He just paid $700 to have two front wheel-bearings put in and I'm wondering if the dealer (GM dealer) told him the noise was a more expensive repair. What really ticks me off if there are two Vibe AWDs for sale in that area. Both are 2004s and both are rust free. Both in the same town and the other one has an asking price of $2400 and also "runs perfect." I wanted to pick a day when I could look at both. The other one is not available to view until next week due to the holiday weekend. This guy (with the one making the noise) had me so convinced that it was a "done deal" - I drove out there. My wife and kid and dog were fine with the trip. Beautiful day, we pigged out at Burger King and hiked some old-growth state forest on the way back. Regardless - I still do not like being jerked around. A note on the Pontiac Vibe/Toyota Matrix. We have a "fleet" of summer cars/trucks and then a few we only drive in winter snow as beaters. The winter rigs have to be 4WD or AWD. Right now we are down to two (almost three). My 1998 Dodge Grand Caravan AWD with 340,000 miles and it runs like new but very rusty. No major repairs ever! Also a 2001 Chevy Tracker 4WD that is really a Suzuki. Great running rig but it is rear-wheel drive as default and slides all over the place unless put into 4WD. A local junkyard owner told me to find a Vibe or Matrix AWD. He says they are the best good-gas-mileage AWD on the planet. We want something with a little cargo room AWD or 4WD, and also good gas-mileage. It is very hard to find anything with a small engine and good MPGs. Our Tracker has a 2.5 V6 and only gets around 22 MPG. Our Dodge Caravan has a 3.8 V6 and gets around 20 MPG (best highway mileage). We also have a 2010 Suzuki XL7 that is really a GM with a 3.6 V6 and that piece of crap only gets 18-19 MPG best. So, I have been looking for two years now for a buy on a AWD or 4WD that can get 26-30 MPG and not cost a fortune. The Toyota Matrix fits the bill as far as I can tell. I am REAL surprised that the one I looked at has had so many repairs with wheel bearings, transfercase seals, etc. I expect better from a Toyota. My rusty 1998 Dodge Grand Caravan has held up much better. So has my 2001 Tracker that had around 300,000 miles and NO major repairs ever. I will note that my in-laws have a 2010 Ford AWD Escape with a 2.5 four-cylinder and that gets 29 MPG @ 65 MPH. I find that amazing. TOO expensive though. They are going to trade it in soon and it only has 35K miles on it. I suspect I will not be willing to match what a dealer will offer them with trade-in.
  16. zero

    New owner here! 1981 Sunrader

    Toyota used the same 5 lug rear axle (as far as load cap goes) from 1975 to the 2000s in the USA and still does in other parts of the world with the Hilux. When used in the 1978 cab & chassis - it is only rated for 2900 max lbs. Same in 1981. Then it climbs up - I suspect since the frame and other parts got higher ratings.
  17. zero

    D*mn Toyotas . . .

    And this 1986 Winnebago Phasar built upon a French commercial van. 60K original miles. Ran perfect and I paid $75 for it. Has no real frame. Just unibody. When I got it home, 20 miles away, it hit a bump and the right rear wheel and suspension almost fell off. What was left of the frame broke in two. Again, stripped it and junked it. Perfect running gas engine and auto trans with lockup and OD and I could not give it away.
  18. zero

    D*mn Toyotas . . .

    That Chinook was a 1977. Now, look at this 1987 dually. NOT much better. I stripped and junked this one too and paid $500 for it.
  19. zero

    D*mn Toyotas . . .

    I would not buy with rust on the truck part unless buying as a parts-rig and just for the RV coach part of it. NOT at that price though. I lived for over 40 years in NY where many roads are salted summer and winter. I know very well how rusty old Japanese metal gets. No way to repair when it gets to a certain point. Only one thing worse and that is old French metal. That was a big problem with the Winnebago Centuri, LeSharo, and Phasars made in the 80s. French sheet metal fell apart -seemingly even if NOT driven on salt. Oddly, here in northern Michigan - the roads are also salted summer and winter yet I find many old RVs with no rust. Here is a typical 70s Toyota that got driven most winters where I lived in NY. I paid $275 for it, stripped it, and junked it.
  20. zero

    D*mn Toyotas . . .

    This was a 2004 with 160K miles and looked like new. Original owner and he had just recently had new wheel bearings put in front. I was not afraid that I could not fix it. The issue is this. I drove a long ways and the seller told me it "ran perfect." I told him before I left home that if it had any known mechanical problems - and it was priced to reflect that - I'd drive down with my Ford truck and car-trailer and trailer this Vibe/Matrix home. But he swore - "no issue and it ran perfect." So I get there and as soon as I see the check-engine-light on, and the awful howl it makes whenever it moves - the seller's credibility was lost to me. He would not drop the price at all and I already offered him full Kelley Blue Book "private sale" value. So, I left. Too bad. It was a nice looking rig with zero rust and that is rare around here for a vehicle that age. No way would I risk driving 130-140 miles home with it.
  21. zero

    D*mn Toyotas . . .

    There was a Bandit for sale for a long time in the Chicago area on CraigsList. Maybe Ebay too (I don't watch Ebay like I do Craigslist). I know the seller said it had bad rust issues, no brakes etc. He also wanted too much money for it. I can''t remember what year it was -but yes - might be the same one. This seller also wants too much for it (in my opinion). I wish I'd had more time to check out that Coachmen. We were on the way to see that Vibe/Matrix and we were running late. The seller had come out, with keys in hand, and wanted me to drive it. He said he knows nothing about diesels but claims it runs like new. It IS amazingly clean under the hood - especially for a 6.2 diesel. This is a first-year 6.2 and there were several major issues with them. Normally - all those issues were fixed within a few years unless the truck got junked. But . ; if by some chance this thing REALLY has only 7000 miles on it - then it might still have all those problems ready to happen? Head-gasket failure was the #1 problem and GM had a kit to fix it. #2 problem was early failure of the fuel injection pump. If I had taken a little more time - I could of looked closely at the engine and found out if it had been updated. Injection-pumps get a metal tag affixed to the top with "EID" on it - to show they have been updated. Those engines are all over the place now and priced next to nothing. That since the US military used them in Humvees and CUCV trucks by the thousands. When I left NY - I had three spare, complete good running 6.2s and wound up giving them away, for free. That a a bunch of 6.2 trucks, K5 Blazers, etc. I did not save any of it and figured I'd never see another 6.2 diesel again. I should take my own advice and NEVER get rid of anything. The seller wants $4000 or "best offer." I might call him and tell him if the price drops to $2500 - I'll buy it. It IS a neat rig. I just wish it had a manual transmission instead of the auto. Since it is a 3/4 ton and not a 1/2 ton - I should have the near indestructible TH400 three-speed automatic, and not the horrible 700R4 used in 1/2 tons and some light-duty 3/4 tons. The 700R4 is a four-speed auto trans with lock-up and it had horrendous problems for it's first 4 years that cannot be upgraded or fixed. 1982 is the first year for the 700R4 trans and for the 6.2 diesel. Only remedy is to find a replacement 700R4 made after 1986 OR replace it with a TH400. Again - I could of known just by looking inside at the shifter but I did not take the time. I now wish I did.
  22. zero

    New owner here! 1981 Sunrader

    GVWR is a product of the limitations of also the engine, the transmission, the frame, final-drive-ratio, etc. That being said - the 5 lug semi-floating rear is rated as high as 3700 lbs. in some of the USA Toyota cab & chassis trucks and 4400 lbs. for the full-floating duallies. The 5 lug semi-floater when used overseas is rated as high as 3900 lbs.
  23. zero

    New owner here! 1981 Sunrader

    To change from 5 lug to 6 lug - using OEM parts - the spindles do not get changed. Just the hubs. As far as brakes go? OEM dually front brakes are 1/2" wider then what a 1981 has. So I assume if you want the dually front brakes on a 1981, you need different calipers and mounting brackets.
  24. zero

    New owner here! 1981 Sunrader

    "Safe" as far as a full-floater rear goes has nothing to do with the bearings. The big plus is NO weight is carried on the drive-axles at all. With a semi-floater - ALL the weight is on the drive axles. Subsequently, with a full-floater - if you break an axle right off - the wheel on that side stays attached. If you break an axle with a semi-floater - the wheel falls off along with a piece of the axle. The little full-floater that Toyota uses came from a Japanese school bus. Just calculating by the mass of the bearings and stubs they mount on, along with the 3 1/8" axle-tubes - it likely has a 5000 lb. rating. That is just the axle assembly and not what it provides when mounted in a little Toyota pickup chassis. There are many other limiting factors.
  25. What can be said? Groovy, man. Or as Linc from Mod Squad once said - "heavy, man."
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